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Archive for the ‘how-to’ Category

Edge-lit seven segment display

Friday, May 24th, 2019

Debra over at Geek Mom Projects posted detailed instructions of how to build this edge-lit seven segment clocks: This build combines small dozens of small laser-cut acrylic pieces which fit together with very tight tolerances. It uses skinny (4mm wide) LED strips which must be soldered, bent, and then slotted in...

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Posted in how-to, LEDs | No Comments »

Minimal ATSAMD21 computer

Thursday, May 9th, 2019

Johnson Davies shared detailed instructions of how to build an ATSAMD21-based computer on a prototyping board using a 32-pin ATSAMD21E: If you're looking for something more powerful than the ATmega328 in the Arduino Uno a good choice is the ATSAMD21. This is an ARM Cortex M0+ processor with up to...

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ATtiny13 – 8bit mono class D amplifier

Thursday, February 21st, 2019

Łukasz Podkalicki shared a how-to on building a Class D amplifier on ATtiny13: I always wonder whether it is possible to make an amplifier of class D on ATtiny13 or not. Some time ago I found George Gardner’s project based on ATtiny85 – TinyD. It was a sign to start challenging it...

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Outdoor UV index sensor

Tuesday, February 19th, 2019

A detailed instructions of how to build this outdoor UV index and ambient light sensor from Mare & Gal Electronics: The VEML6075 senses UVA and UVB light and incorporates photodiode, amplifiers, and analog / digital circuits into a single chip using a CMOS process. When the UV sensor is applied, it is able to...

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Posted in how-to, sensors | No Comments »

Semiconductor radioactivity detector – part 2

Tuesday, February 19th, 2019

Robert Gawron has been working on a radioactivity detector, that is available on GitHub: There are many ways to measure radioactivity level, semiconductor detectors sense interactions between ionizing radiation and p-n junction. Because in hobbyist area most popular are Geiger-Muller based detectors (in short: not a semiconductor but lamp based...

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Viewing ARM CPU activity in real time

Friday, January 18th, 2019

Jeremy Bentham writes: In previous blog posts, I have described how an FTDI USB device can be programmed in Python to access the SWD bus of an ARM microprocessor. This allows the internals of the CPU to be accessed, without disrupting the currently running program. In this blog I take...

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Posted in ARM, how-to | No Comments »

PLA dielectric strength measurement

Monday, January 14th, 2019

Kerry Wong did some experiment measuring the dielectric breakdown voltage of PLA: In my previous post, I designed and 3D printed a high voltage connector for my Bertan 225-20R high voltage power supply. The silicone high voltage wire I ordered had finally arrived so I made a couple of cables...

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Posted in how-to, measurement | No Comments »

The CAN bus

Wednesday, December 19th, 2018

Jean-Claude has made a series of blog posts on using the Controller Area Network (CAN) bus: This is the first of what I expect to become a multi-part article series on the CAN bus. I’d like to describe the features of CAN which I find particularly elegant and useful, and...

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Building a direct conversion receiver

Tuesday, December 11th, 2018

Ryan Flowers over at MiscDotGeek posted a how-to on building a direct conversion receiver: In the first installment of this series, we discussed why we’re building a Direct Conversion receiver and talked about some basic ideas. In this installment, we explore what it takes to make the leap from a...

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Teensy 3.6 as standalone mediator between USB MIDI and Eurorack

Friday, December 7th, 2018

Sebastian writes: USB MIDI controllers (such as Launchpad Mini Mk II for example) are common and often quite low in cost. To interface such a controller with a Eurorack synth system, often a host computer and a MIDI to CV interface might be used. The host computer would take USB...

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Calibrate a magnetic sensor

Monday, November 19th, 2018

Liudr shared a how-to on calibrating a sensor: First of all, what is calibration? In a general sense, calibrating a sensor makes the sensor provide the most accurate readings allowed by the sensor’s own precision. As an example, let’s assume for a moment that the earth’s magnetic field and any...

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Povon home energy monitor part 1, 20 channel system

Thursday, October 25th, 2018

Coyt Barringer documented his home energy monitor project called POVON. This first part of a series will detail the 20 Channel sub-metering hardware: Our initial goal was to monitor power consumption in different parts of the house, and we quickly realized every household circuit would need to be monitored. After...

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IoT LED Dimmer

Tuesday, September 25th, 2018

Sasa Karanovic shared a how-to on making a IoT LED dimmer: Making a IoT LED dimmer that you can control via your PC, phone, tablet or any other device connected to the network is super simple, and I’m going to show you how. I’m sharing my three channel LED dimmer...

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How to build your Energy Load manager

Wednesday, September 12th, 2018

A detailed instructions of how to build an Energy Load manager from Open Electronics: When the instantaneous power consumption exceeds the set values, it selectively disconnects the users, in order to prevent the electric meter to cut the power to disconnect. The management of the electricity users at home, intended...

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Posted in how-to, open source | No Comments »

Assembly instructions for the STMBL servo drive

Monday, July 23rd, 2018

Andy Pugh wrote a post on his blog detailing STMBL servo drive assembly: The main documentation (work in progress) is relevant to both the current and future versions of the drive. However due to the withdrawal from the market of the IRAM256 chip used by the board any future versions...

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Hand soldering a WLCSP package

Wednesday, July 18th, 2018

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=edERx4x5eY0 MSOP-10 soldering video at mitxela.com: I admit that when I made the video of me soldering an MSOP-10 package, I did it because I needed to use the chip right away, and didn't have time to order a breakout board. But this time, I am just doing this for fun....

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DIY Arduino FM radio

Monday, July 2nd, 2018

Nick over at educ8s.tv shared detailed instructions of how to build this DIY Art Deco style FM Radio project using Arduino: Let’s see what we are going to build today! As you can see, we are going to build an Art Deco style FM radio receiver. The design of this...

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Posted in Arduino, DIY, how-to | 1 Comment »

Bit-bang FTDI USB-to-serial converters to drive SPI devices

Wednesday, June 13th, 2018

Scott W Harden writes , "The FT232 USB-to-serial converter is one of the most commonly-used methods of adding USB functionality to small projects, but recently I found that these chips are capable of sending more than just serial signals. With some creative programming, individual output pins can be big-banged to...

Posted in how-to, techniques | 3 Comments »

An easy way to mount DS18B20 temperature sensors

Tuesday, June 5th, 2018

Matt wrote an article describing a technique he used to mount DS18B20 temperature sensors: One of the biggest advantage of these sensors over I2C sensors, is that you can mount them almost anywhere. That having been said, I’ve never quite managed to come up with an elegant solution, particularly when...

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Posted in how-to, techniques | 2 Comments »

How not to build a semiconductor lapping machine

Tuesday, May 15th, 2018

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TcI6T91u3xQ electronupdate writes: One area of silicon reverse engineering which has interested me is the delayering of a chip to see each layer which allows superior visibility into the circuitry. I know of two ways: chemical etch and mechanical means. In this video I try to make a mechanical grinder...

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Recent Comments

  • Max: Seems like an unexpectedly violent way to remove the chip indeed. A hot air station should of course do the job just fine, but in...
  • jose: Part removal described here is pure butchery, the cheapest hot air station will do a fast and clean job removing the QFP, heat air to...
  • Cody: Yes please
  • Marko: armature -> amateur
  • Crawford: Dibs,