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Posts Tagged ‘Atmega168’

DirtyPCB IKEA Samtid mood-light upgrade

Saturday, August 30th, 2014

madworm writes: Just wanting to share one of my latest projects, made possible by DirtyPCBs. I got a lot of good boards (actually 2 designs) and saved 25$ using this service. Very nice. It's a simple thing, just a micro (ATmega168) + a bunch of WS2812B LEDs. Main purpose: more...

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Posted in project logs | No Comments »

Power line communication

Thursday, April 10th, 2014

Haris Andrianakis wrote a post on his blog detailing his power line communication system: The main purpose was to implement two devices communicating each other, using the technology of power line. Specifically, at this project the communication has been used to send data from a weight bridge/ weight machine to a remote display. For...

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Posted in AVR, data transfer | 2 Comments »

Telepresence robot using Microchip PIC16F1829 and Atmel AVR ATmega168 I2C smart DC motor controller microcontroller – Part 2

Friday, December 6th, 2013

Ronald of ermicroblog writes: The I2C (read as I square C) smart DC motor controller is designed using the Atmel 8-bit AVR Atmega168 microcontroller and configured to act as the I2C slave device where it could be controlled by other microcontroller or microprocessor through the I2C SDA (serial data) and SCL (serial...

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Posted in robotics | No Comments »

Reading and writing Atmega168 EEPROM

Monday, January 10th, 2011

Here's a tutorial from Protostack for beginners on how to read and write EEPROM on the Atmega 168 and display the values on an attached LCD. Includes source code in C.

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Posted in AVR, code, how-to, LCD | 1 Comment »

AVR based power usage monitor

Sunday, December 12th, 2010

Dan Stahlke built an open source homebrew power usage meter based on the Atmega168. The project stores the measurements on an SD card. Just might be the ticket for monitoring holiday display power usage. Via Electronics-lab.

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Posted in AVR, builds, measurement | No Comments »

Recent Comments

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