Battery powered LED Matrix clock project

Posted on Monday, March 10th, 2014 in project logs by DP


cburns shared his LED Matrix clock in the project log forum:

My latest electronic project, the LEDC which is a LED Matrix clock. It’s the size of a standard business-card, and battery powered. I wanted something that would sit on the desk and I thought, why not use business card holder? It works great, and it’s definitely a conversation starter. It’s battery powered, uses a Microchip PIC18 series processor which does everything from time keeping to display driving. The firmware has a lot of functionality (one might say too much):

Low power battery operation
Traditional digital clock mode
24 hour military style digital clock
Binary coded decimal clock mode
Binary Clock mode
Scrolling Date text mode
Hour Glass count down timer
Pomodoro Timer
Dice rolling mode
Scrolling text message mode
Built in buzzer for alerts with selectable volume
3 independent alarms
Multiple chime options
Multiple power saving options

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