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App note: Understanding common-mode signals

Posted on Saturday, June 22nd, 2013 in app notes by DP

maxApp

Here is a tutorial from Maxim on common-mode signals.

To understand how common-mode signals are created and then suppressed, you should first understand the interaction of shields and grounds in common cable configurations. The following discussion defines a common-mode signal, reviews the common cable configurations, considers shielded vs. unshielded cables, and describes typical grounding practices. The article discusses methods whereby common-mode signals are created and rejected.

The primary focus of this discussion is on RS-485/RS-422 cables and signals, but the discussion also applies to telephone, audio, video, and computer-network signals.

This entry was posted on Saturday, June 22nd, 2013 at 9:00 pm and is filed under app notes. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can skip to the end and leave a response. Pinging is currently not allowed.

One Response to “App note: Understanding common-mode signals”

  1. Alan says:

    If signals get coupled into an earth line, does that effect the operation of Earth Leakage Circuit Breakers [ELCB’s] ?
    Older models purely check for balance between active & neutral: any mismatch triggers the breaker. Do newer models check for current on the earth wire?

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