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DIMBODY 3d desktop scanner

Posted on Saturday, August 31st, 2013 in 3D fabrication, DIY by the machinegeek


We previously covered Alessandro Grossi’s DIY 3d scanner. Now this project is becoming a start-up known as the DIMBODY. He describes, “DIMBODY is a 3d scanner, a digitalizer that allows you to take a physical object, and turn it into a digital 3D model on your computer.

DIMBODY is based of triangulation between laser plane and a CMOS monochromatic sensor, it acquires point coordinates of an object (point cloud). The point cloud is then transformed in a 3d surface by the software and saved as a STL file. Then you can print it in your 3d printer, or scale, transform, modify it in a CAD software.”

Via the contact form.

This entry was posted on Saturday, August 31st, 2013 at 5:30 pm and is filed under 3D fabrication, DIY. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can skip to the end and leave a response. Pinging is currently not allowed.

4 Responses to “DIMBODY 3d desktop scanner”

  1. Maker 3DP says:

    Can you provide CAD software?

  2. Nate B says:

    Autoplay videos make the baby cellphone internet connection cry. :(

  3. JBeale says:

    Neat device, seems to have very good resolution. I see from the video at 1:24 it is powered by a Raspberry Pi and is using the R-Pi CSI-2 camera (5 Mpixel OV5647).

  4. jrd210 says:

    CAD software is available as open source freeware so they would not need to provide any more than an *stl file. Send it to Netfabb (free) for final improvement as it likely will have a lot of holes in it.

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