App note: digital constant current power LED driver

Posted on Saturday, August 31st, 2013 in app notes by DP


Here is an app note from Microchip describing how a PIC12HV615 MCU can be used to implement a digital current control loop for power LEDs:

This document describes a power LED driver solution using the PIC12HV615 microcontroller (MCU). The PIC12HV615 is an 8-pin MCU with many integrated analog features. The LED driver circuit is a buck (stepdown) solution and the circuit presented here can operate from most any input voltage source as long as it exceeds the forward voltage of the LEDs to be driven.

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One Response to “App note: digital constant current power LED driver”

  1. John Little says:

    Thanks, this is someothing I’m investigating at the minute!

    I was wondering about building a “micro-bench” PSU with voltage / current control (from USB / serial) up to 5V / 900mA, as supplied by a USB3 port. Something with high efficiency components that would sit comfortably in a tiny USB module, say the size of a USB soundcard.

    Probably loads of applications for this but for me, this would be ideal to drive some LEDs in current mode rather than PWM (usually around 3.1V, 0 to 1A) for microscopy.

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