Silkscreen PCBs with vinyl stickers and toner transfer

Posted on Wednesday, December 19th, 2012 in PCBs, tutorials by DP


Make DIY silkscreens using vinyl stickers, similar to making PCBs with toner transfer methods:

Below I am going to detail the process of making the silkscreen, which is the side of the printed circuit board where we solder the electrical components. We will use the same method, vinyl sticker pcb.

This entry was posted on Wednesday, December 19th, 2012 at 7:00 pm and is filed under PCBs, tutorials. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can skip to the end and leave a response. Pinging is currently not allowed.

One Response to “Silkscreen PCBs with vinyl stickers and toner transfer”

  1. Tom Price says:

    I did exactly this when making a prototype of my Magic Mouth speech shield this week, and it works really well. The image transfers well and touching up is very easy. It is convenient to use transparent vinyl because if the image does not transfer first time, transparent vinyl is easier to realign before reheating. I have had success using glossy clear shelf liner. If i have one quibble with the write up it is that I am not completely decided on the merits of cooling the board before peeling off the vinyl. I think the toner might stick better if the vinyl is peeled off while the board is still warm but I have not done enough test strips to be absolutely sure.

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