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App note: Successful PCB grounding with mixed-signal chips

Posted on Saturday, October 20th, 2012 in app notes by DP

Here’s a tutorial from Maxim describing how to ground chips that use both analog and digital signals. The article goes into current path theory, and provides tips on how to improve your signal integrity in mixed signal devices.

This tutorial discusses proper printed-circuit board (PCB) grounding for mixed-signal designs. For most applications a simple method without cuts in the ground plane allows for successful PCB layouts with this kind of IC. We begin this document with the basics: where the current flows. Later, we describe how to place components and route signal traces to minimize problems with crosstalk. Finally, we move on to consider power supply-currents and end by discussing how to extend what we have learned to circuits with multiple mixed-signal ICs.

This entry was posted on Saturday, October 20th, 2012 at 9:00 pm and is filed under app notes. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can skip to the end and leave a response. Pinging is currently not allowed.

One Response to “App note: Successful PCB grounding with mixed-signal chips”

  1. Chuckt says:

    Who’s Afraid of the Big Bad Bend?
    http://www.sigcon.com/Pubs/edn/bigbadbend.htm

    Right-angle bends in PC-board traces perform perfectly well in digital designs in speeds as fast as 2 Gbps. EDN 5/11/2000(by Howard Johnson)

    Alphabetical Index
    Please wait while this page loads… it’s huge.

    You might want to check out the articles on High Speed Digitial Design:

    All Publications © by Dr. Howard Johnson 1993 – 2012 except as noted.

    http://www.sigcon.com/Pubs/pubsAlpha.htm

    http://www.sigcon.com/Pubs/index.htm

    I learned about these publications from:

    http://forum.6502.org/viewtopic.php?p=17664#p17664

    (There is a lot of knowledge that the old timers have from users of obsolete technology.)

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