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3 cent PMS150C MCU driving 300 WS2812B LED’s

Posted on Tuesday, June 25th, 2019 in LEDs by DP

20190422_0010

Driving 300 WS2812B RGB LED’s with “the 3 cent microcontroller” – the Padauk PMS150C.

The 3 cent Padauk PMS150C is.. Interesting to say the least. First of all there’s a lot this little MCU doesn’t do. It doesn’t have a lot of code space (1K Word), it doesn’t have a lot of RAM (64 bytes) and it doesn’t even do hardware multiplication. It doesn’t have an instruction for loading data from ROM either(Though there are ways of getting around this – but that’s a subject for another post). And of course – you can only program it ONCE.

More details at ABNielsen.com.

Check out the video after the break.

This entry was posted on Tuesday, June 25th, 2019 at 11:50 pm and is filed under LEDs. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can skip to the end and leave a response. Pinging is currently not allowed.

One Response to “3 cent PMS150C MCU driving 300 WS2812B LED’s”

  1. William says:

    lol I’m happy to waste 3c for each program/debug cycle… but probably not the time spent soldering a new device down to a proto board!

    Do they sell a flash version that one could use to debug, before committing to the OTP?

    This thing seems about as grunty as the PIC16F84 that I spent a load of time writing asm for, once upon a time, and that system is still running happily, ~20 years later.

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