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Weather logger with Losant and Amazon Alexa

Posted on Thursday, November 30th, 2017 in Arduino, sensors, wireless by DP

losant

Steve documented his experience experimenting with home weather logging:

Like a million other people on the Internet, I’ve been experimenting with home weather logging. I roll my eyes at the phrase “Internet of Things”, but it’s hard to deny the potential of cheap networked sensors and switches, and a weather logging system is like this field’s Hello World application. Back in June I posted about my initial experiments in ESP8266 weather logging. Since then I’ve finalized the hardware setup, installed multiple nodes around the house, organized a nice web page to analyze all the data, and integrated everything with Amazon Alexa. Time for an update.

More details at Big Mess o’ Wires homepage.

Check out the video after the break.

This entry was posted on Thursday, November 30th, 2017 at 2:15 pm and is filed under Arduino, sensors, wireless. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can skip to the end and leave a response. Pinging is currently not allowed.

2 Responses to “Weather logger with Losant and Amazon Alexa”

  1. KH says:

    Nice, until… Amazon Alexa. Ewwwwww… the CIA thanks you for the on-demand data.

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