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DIY programming adapters

Posted on Thursday, March 23rd, 2017 in Prototypes, testing by DP

4p_pogo_before-1080x675

Sjaak writes:

Today came in a new batch of PCBs from DirtyPCB.com, of which one is a new revision of the BlackMagicProbe. This revision is almost the same except it has a polyfuse in its powersupply to the target, a dedicated voltage regulator instead of P-FET, its programming header on the 90 degree on the side and a jumper for entering DFU mode. All this goodness is contained in less 5×2 cm PCB space, so quite a bit of PCB estate is left for other purposes and I used panelizing in EAGLE to try another brainfart of mine.
In most DIY projects where pogo pins are used people solder them directly to a wire or pad on a PCB. Despite it looks like it is the way to go, it isn’t. Pogo pins tend to wear out relative quickly as they are only rated for a couple of hundred ‘compressions’, also solder can sip into the pin and ruin its spring.

More details at smdprutser.nl.

This entry was posted on Thursday, March 23rd, 2017 at 1:53 am and is filed under Prototypes, testing. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can skip to the end and leave a response. Pinging is currently not allowed.

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