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Audible frequency chirp sonar with the Stellaris Launchpad

Posted on Wednesday, January 21st, 2015 in ARM, hacks by DP

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Jason Bowling writes:

Over the last year I’ve been working towards an underwater sonar system for ROVs and surface boats. In order to learn the basic signal processing required to detect the echoes, I initially got a simple sonar working in air with a desktop conferencing USB speaker/mic running on Windows. A writeup, including source, is here. That article describes the algorithms used in detail and would be a good read if you want the details of how this works.
The next logical step seemed to be to get it working on a microcontroller. There are plenty of low cost ultrasonic sonar modules available that work really well in air, but the idea was to work towards getting a sonar that worked in water. There are currently no low cost sonar modules for hobby use in water.

Check out the video after the break.

This entry was posted on Wednesday, January 21st, 2015 at 7:05 pm and is filed under ARM, hacks. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can skip to the end and leave a response. Pinging is currently not allowed.

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