App note: SCT2024 16 channel LED driver

Posted on Saturday, February 9th, 2013 in app notes by DP


A part presentation from the Electronic City blog describes the SCT2024 16 channel LED driver with programmable current output and a serial control interface.

SCT2024 integrated circuit is a serial-parallel interface for LEDs with the programming and the limiting of the current on outputs in between 5 and 45mA. It makes an ideal option for commanding the displays with common anode with microcontroller. So the led driver is our discussion topic for today.

This entry was posted on Saturday, February 9th, 2013 at 1:00 pm and is filed under app notes. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can skip to the end and leave a response. Pinging is currently not allowed.

2 Responses to “App note: SCT2024 16 channel LED driver”

  1. Guan Yang says:

    It looks like a simpler interface than the ubiquitous TLC5940. Fewer pins at least.

  2. robert says:

    True, but you constantly have to feed it with data to get individually PWM-ed outputs. The TI-chip at least does that. Some Macroblock chips with integrated PWM are cheaper than the TI ones, but the interface is a bit nasty. It’s basically SPI, but some commands are encoded in the latch/clock timings, so you can’t use hardware SPI with fixed 8-bit writes. But again that doesn’t matter a bit if FPGAs are used. It only sucks for micros.

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