Categories

Simple electronic circuit patents

Posted on Thursday, February 7th, 2013 in legislation by DP

UnderVoltagePatentApplication

While circuits can’t be copyrighted, they can be patented. Mats spotted this simple undervoltage indication circuit that is supposedly covered by a patent. As always the devils are in the details, so a specific non-obvious aspect of the circuit may be the patented component. Imagine how difficult innovation would be if there were a patent war over simple stuff like this though. Ugh.

Via the forum.

This entry was posted on Thursday, February 7th, 2013 at 7:00 pm and is filed under legislation. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can skip to the end and leave a response. Pinging is currently not allowed.

6 Responses to “Simple electronic circuit patents”

  1. Drone says:

    So this is a Patent Application from 2009? Was the patent awarded? A patent and a patent-award are very different things. What is the component L? I Agree, the US Patent and Trade Office is another example of Big Government failure. Couple that with the corrupt and greedy Trial Lawyers and we have – what we have…

  2. James Hendry says:

    L would be an LED I suppose. Maybe the latrene for the BS

    • r4k says:

      More likely Lamp or Load.

      • James Hendry says:

        Agree or part of the battery circuit on a 787 they did not know so used a Lighter. Looks like a circuit I saw in 1976 when I started.
        Could you still buy lamps stateside in 2009? I’m always having to buy 6.3v for a customer. there is one booth in Shenzhen still has them.

  3. pat ent says:

    A simple circuit in common use should not be patentable… and I think you could find “prior art” on this type of circuit anyway. But even if it is patented, why does it matter? Does the patent prohibit construction by individuals for personal use? I think not.

    • Moby Disk says:

      “Does the patent prohibit construction by individuals for personal use? I think not.”
      Legally, in the US, yes it does. But rarely does anyone prosecute for this since there is no money in it, and they would never know.

Leave a Reply

Notify me of followup comments via e-mail. You can also subscribe without commenting.

Recent Comments

  • coppice: If all you have found so far is fake iphones, the next place you should visit is SEG in Hua Qiang Bei. Get out of...
  • Edward Cooper: Great article and good find on the markets! Any chance you can provide the locations of these places? I'm in Shenzhen at the moment and...
  • Dan: I'm up for one
  • TrickyNekro: Always in for another bunch! :-D
  • mol-1: Maybe this time !