Fine pitch BGA deadbug soldering

Posted on Thursday, November 15th, 2012 in DIY by DP

Xevel shows us how to solder fine pitch BGA dead-bug:

After seeing a few posts about “deadbugging” (soldering wires to the leads or pads of a component instead of soldering it on its recommended footprint) of BGA chips on Dangerous Prototypes, some with “big” solder balls, and some with smaller ones, I thought I would share my latest attempt at it.

Via the comments.

Check out the video after the break.

This entry was posted on Thursday, November 15th, 2012 at 6:00 pm and is filed under DIY. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can skip to the end and leave a response. Pinging is currently not allowed.

2 Responses to “Fine pitch BGA deadbug soldering”

  1. JBeale says:

    Impressive work, I would not have thought to try it that way. Re: “…remote temperature was jumping all over. ” I have the USB eval board for that chip, the TI TMP006. As I recall, this chip is equally sensitive to IR radiation from both the front side and the back side. That why you need to mount it backed against a solid IR-opaque surface with the same temperature as the chip itself, to get useful IR temperature readings. I think there is an app note that goes into some detail about the board layout requirements.

  2. Drone says:

    This is new? Just a minor variant on dead-bug. I’ve done this kind of thing many times. Another option where lead-length matters (parasitics!) is to solder small wire tails on the BGA pads then solder the ends of the tails directly to the host device pins (and/or a small breakout). This I call Octupus Wiring. The name should trigger an image… Simple. But it takes keen vision (magnification) and a very steady hand.

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