EEWeb: Bus Pirate as low-cost JTAG programmer

Posted on Saturday, May 26th, 2012 in Bus Pirate, News, programmers by the machinegeek

Victor Joukov noticed this article on the EEWeb electrical engineering community about Programming With Low-Cost JTAG Tools, referencing the Bus Pirate.

Notable is the Bus Pirate from Dangerous Prototypes. Originally designed as a tool to sniff, monitor, inject or bus protocols like SPI, its open platform has meant that the ‘community’ has developed an XSVF player. This allows a user to convert an SVF file format to XSVF with the tools supplied. The board, which is a very good price, can then be easily re-programmed as a JTAG programmer. You then simply run the right command from your computer and the file is uploaded to the Bus Pirate via USB which then carries out the required toggling of the JTAG lines.

You can order your own Bus Pirate for under $30 today.

Via the contact form.

This entry was posted on Saturday, May 26th, 2012 at 12:01 am and is filed under Bus Pirate, News, programmers. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can skip to the end and leave a response. Pinging is currently not allowed.

One Response to “EEWeb: Bus Pirate as low-cost JTAG programmer”

  1. Hi,

    I’m glad you liked the article. I was given then Bus Pirate as a gift from another engineer and found its a great tool. I think its a great way of showing how you can get so many different uses from a single design and hop other engineers see the potential of this design method.

    I’m certainly looking forward to using the other features too.

    So although I did not say it in the blog post, well done Dangerous Prototypes!

    Paul (aka @monpjc)

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