Arduino RFID time clock

Posted on Sunday, April 8th, 2012 in Arduino, project logs, RFID by the machinegeek

FRIC at ivoidwarranties has developed an Arduino addiction. So when his company needed a replacement time clock he wasn’t content to settle for a substandard commercial unit. In the true hacker spirit he designed his own superior time clock system using Arduino and a Stronglink SL018. The SL018 is an RFID reader/writer that interfaces via I2C. Conveniently, it has a ready made Arduino library.

Though initially designed to work in conjunction with a connected PC, he expanded the system to use micro SD card logging and ethernet connectivity, along with an DS3232 RTC in order to make the project a standalone unit.

FRIC has documented this project’s development in Part 1 and Part 2 of his posts and promises more details. Interesting, practical project. We’d like to see a link to the code/schematic.

This entry was posted on Sunday, April 8th, 2012 at 3:48 pm and is filed under Arduino, project logs, RFID. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can skip to the end and leave a response. Pinging is currently not allowed.

One Response to “Arduino RFID time clock”

  1. Thanks for such social platform which give us variety of idea to explore ourself technically .This exposure give benefits to everyone to fit or to surive in global market which is very essential in the global era.

Leave a Reply

Notify me of followup comments via e-mail. You can also subscribe without commenting.

Recent Comments

  • Nathan Johnson: 100 channels. Not many are legal in any given area. Be sure to comply with local laws.
  • William Brodie-Tyrrell: It's getting to the point where it's cheaper and definitely easier to use a Pi Zero or similar and a $20 3G USB dongle. Power...
  • KH: IIRC most of the actual operating system of modern HDDs is in one of the platter(s); the stuff on the 25VF010 is a bootup firmware......
  • Trev: I don't know of any inexpensive 3G modules (prices start around $US 50), but it does explain why 2G modules are relatively inexpensive by comparison....
  • Zonie: This site Rocks!