Defcon 21 video: Hardware hacking with MCUs

At last years Defcon conference in Las Vegas, NV, hardware hackers Joe Grand, Mark ‘Smtty’ Smith, LosT, RenderMan and FirmWarez discussed their experiences in using various microcontrollers. Interesting stuff, particularly If you’re just getting started with electronics and are trying to navigate the sea of available microcontrollers, microprocessors, and modules.

DEFCON video: Live Free or RFID Hard

In this talk from the 2013 DEFCON conference, Francis Brown and Bishop Fox provide practical insight into how RFID proximity badge systems work. They highlight the real world difficulties encountered in reading RFID prox cards with conventional readers, and what you’ll need to build out your own RFID physical penetration toolkit. They use an Arduino […]

DEFCON video: Hacking Driverless Vehicles

In this presentation from the recent Defcon 21 conference, Zoz Brooks provides an overview of the current state of civil driverless vehicles and what hackers or miscreants might do to mess with them. Topics covered include common sensors, decision profiles and their potential failure modes that could be exploited. While many remember Zoz as co-host […]

DEFCON 20: Hacking Measured Boot and UEFI

UEFI secure booting has been on the minds of many hackers and open sources advocates. Some believe that it will lock out certain operating systems in favor of vendor’s proprietary systems. (There have even been recent reports of bricking Samsung laptops just by trying to boot Linux.) In this video from last Summer’s DEFCON 20 […]

DEFCON 20: bypassing endpoint security with USB keys

In this talk from the DEFCON 20 conference, Phil Polsta, Computer Security Professor at the University of Dubuque discusses the relative insecurity of using USB “keys” as a way of restricting access to tech resources. He explains in detail how any USB mass storage (flash or hard) drive can be made to appear as an […]

Try your hand at DEFCON 2012 decryption challenge

At the recently concluded DEFCON 20 conference in Las Vegas, attendees were presented with this decryption challenge by KoreLogic Security. Take their collection of encrypted password hashes and a bundle of encrypted files and see how many you can crack. File types are from various systems, including UNIX servers, Windows AD, LDAP servers, webapps, etc. […]

DEFCON 20 badge features Parallax Propeller

DEFCON 20 is currently underway in Las Vegas and this year the electronic hackable badge is back! This year the badge is based on the Parallax Propeller P8X32A 32-bit multicore processor. “The badge features an infrared LED and receiver for badge-to-badge communication, a bank of eight LEDs for visual feedback and a USB circuit for […]

Defcon 19: Kinect + Metasploit = Kinectasploit

In this presentation from last summer’s Defcon 19 conference, Jeff Bryner, Owner of P0wnlabs.com, demonstrates how to integrate the Kinect with Metasploit. He uses the open source Blender 3D game engine to interface the Kinect hardware with Metasploit. This hack allows you to launch preassigned Metasploit attacks based upon your gestures as detected by the […]

Video: Hardware hacking for software guys

As the time for Defcon 19 nears we got to looking over last years videos and found this intro to Arduino for software guys. Dave King’s presentation is one of the better tutorials for programmers who want to learn the basics of the Arduino. An introduction for newbies, a refresher for the rest of us. […]

DEFCON 16: hardware trojans using FPGA

At the DEFCON 16 hacker conference, Fouad Kiamilev and Ryan Hoover gave a presentation on the security threat presented by hardware Trojans, extra circuitry illicitly added to hardware during its manufacture. When triggered, the hardware Trojan performs an illicit action such as leaking secret information, allowing attackers clandestine access or control, or disabling or reducing […]

Making of the Defcon 18 badge

Joe Grand of Grand Idea Studio presents the backstory to his design of the Defcon 18 conference badge. (Joe’s talk actually begins at 09:05.) The badge is based around a Freescale MC56F8006 16-bit digital signal controller and a Kent Displays 128-by-32 pixel reflective cholesteric liquid crystal display (ChLCD). Other functionality includes USB connectivity, seamless power […]