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Arduino based sensor shoes assist visually impaired

Posted on Monday, August 12th, 2013 in open source, Prototypes, sensors by the machinegeek

TheShow
Student and developer Denver Dias has posted an intro to his undergrad project in Engineering: a walking aid for the blind.

The walking aid consists of a pair of shoes attached with ultrasonic sensors on the sensing side. The information, obtained from these sensors, is used to form a virtual map of the surroundings. This information is processed and fed to the user via the sense of touch. He used the Arduino Mega 2560 for processing and created a custom shield as a mega-connector to the rest of the contraption. Feedback is provided to the user via vibrating elements placed in the trouser pockets.

Denver will be releasing the open source project build details in a series of posts. For info and updates on this developing project, visit his RevRYL blog.

This entry was posted on Monday, August 12th, 2013 at 1:42 am and is filed under open source, Prototypes, sensors. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can skip to the end and leave a response. Pinging is currently not allowed.

2 Responses to “Arduino based sensor shoes assist visually impaired”

  1. I’m sure this will work very well in Malaysia with tropical rainstorms almost every day :) Well, actually the ultrasonics would probably work just fine under water as long as the connections are waterproofed.

  2. linson says:

    Hi,
    I an a engineering final year student .could you please send me the project details. I am really interested to do this project… Please……

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