Workshop video #05: USB Persistence of Vision Toy firmware

Posted on Thursday, January 26th, 2012 in POV Toy, Videos by Ian

After more than a year of off and on development, there’s finally a working firmware for the USB Persistence of Vision Toy. With a bit more tweaking we’ll be ready to release the code. This week’s workshop video is an overview of the POV Toy project.

  • Displays pattern or words when waved in the air
  • USB interface for pattern uploads, firmware updates
  • Accelerometer tracks hand motion to sync display
  • See the prototype history

We also break out the updated POV Toy PCB. It’s shaped to be easy to hold, and includes a LiPO batter charger. Prototype PCBs are available in the free PCB drawer.

This entry was posted on Thursday, January 26th, 2012 at 4:22 pm and is filed under POV Toy, Videos. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can skip to the end and leave a response. Pinging is currently not allowed.

One Response to “Workshop video #05: USB Persistence of Vision Toy firmware”

  1. Drone says:

    Very nice… Does the character spacing remain constant if you change the speed of motion? With other words, does the firmware integrate the accelerometer data to determine the velocity, which in-turn is used to set the pixel update rate? Or do you just use the accelerometer to determine the direction of motion – hence the order in which the pixel data is read-out?

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