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Derbycon/Defcon: battery firmware hacking

Posted on Friday, October 28th, 2011 in code, hacks, talks by the machinegeek


We use laptops everyday and as long as the battery isn’t dead we probably don’t give it much thought. It turns out that most laptop batteries contain a smart chip which controls battery charge rate and ensures safety parameters are observed among other purposes.

In this video from the recently concluded Derbycon conference in Louisville, KY, software hacker Charlie Miller delves into the hardware and software he examined researching an Apple laptop battery. The talk includes references to code downloads which allow access to the battery communications API and techniques for hacking the firmware to possibly extend you battery’s warranty. Interesting talk on a subject you probably never thought about. (Audio clears up at around 10:00.)

You can download the code and other materials referenced in this talk from the Accuvant labs website.

This talk was also presented at Defcon 19. You can view the Defcon version here.

This entry was posted on Friday, October 28th, 2011 at 4:00 pm and is filed under code, hacks, talks. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can skip to the end and leave a response. Pinging is currently not allowed.

3 Responses to “Derbycon/Defcon: battery firmware hacking”

  1. George says:

    “In this video from the recently concluded Derbycon conference”

    If so, I think you might have the title mistaken…

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