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Open source chipKIT compiler works with other PIC32s

Posted on Monday, May 30th, 2011 in PIC by Ian

Markus used the new open source PIC32 chipkit compiler with non-chipkit hardware and programmed the firmware with a picKIT3:

Since I had a board with a PIC32MX795F512H I built some time ago lying around, I tried if I could get some “Arduino”-code running on it. It works.

The linker scripts that ship with mpide assume that the binary is used together with a bootloader, so I provided a new script, which allowed me programming the .hex file using the PICkit3. All necessary files are provided in the attached .zip archive.

It’s nice to be able to use C++ on the PIC32. Finally.

Via the forum.

This entry was posted on Monday, May 30th, 2011 at 12:16 pm and is filed under PIC. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can skip to the end and leave a response. Pinging is currently not allowed.

8 Responses to “Open source chipKIT compiler works with other PIC32s”

  1. Chuckt says:

    Markus,

    Cool stuff.

    Every time I look around, there is a new board or a new microcontroller. I only have so much time and so much money. What controller package would you recommend and what is your background? Did you take electrical engineering or is this your hobby?

    Chuck

  2. Markus Gritsch says:

    > Every time I look around, there is a new board or a new microcontroller.

    Then you look around to infrequently :)

    > What controller package would you recommend

    Not sure what you mean with “controller package”, but if you are asking what board you should buy, the answer is not so straightforward. Depends on so much factors, thus the plethora on different boards available. For which task, how much MIPS are required, what languages can you program in, how much should it cost — clearly there has to be a compromise you must make.

    As a general advice, start with *something*, then you will get a better feeling for what is around, gain experience what other boards can do compared to your kit, etc.

    That having said, the original Arduino has definitely its pros. Take a look, if you can make sense of what their website says. If you are unexperienced, I don’t recommend some Arduino-wannabe, you will definitely run into trouble.

    > Did you take electrical engineering or is this your hobby

    Both :) Although my dayjob isn’t EE.

  3. Chuckt says:

    >If you are unexperienced, I don’t recommend some Arduino-wannabe, you will definitely run into trouble.

    How are users going to learn? The most tutorials are on the Arduino.

    I have a Pikit2 with two different pics, an AT Tiny, a Propeller, and an Arduino.

    What do you use mainly?

    • twoerner says:

      >>If you are unexperienced, I don’t recommend some Arduino-wannabe,
      >>you will definitely run into trouble.
      >
      >How are users going to learn? The most tutorials are on the Arduino.

      I think (and I might be wrong) that you’re mis-interpreting Markus’ comment. I *believe* he is saying “don’t use an Arduino _clone_” whereas it appears you though he was saying “don’t use an Arduino”.

  4. Markus Gritsch says:

    > What do you use mainly?

    As I already said, it depends on a lot of factors. There is no “one size fits all” solution/platform/kit/board. Some defend their favorite chip like a religion. Don’t do that.

    If you are proficient with the stuff you have, you don’t have to jump on every band-wagon. You can make awesome stuff with PIC, AVR, MSP430, etc.

  5. Chuckt says:

    Markus,

    There were projects were people added a second SID chip to the Commodore 64 to play music. It would be great if someone were to add a second set of lines for speakers and or used a second board to implement a second emulated SID chip.

    I forget if this was the case on the Amiga but the Catweasel had sockets for two SID chips so I’m thinking the Amiga did have two SID chips.

    Chuck

  6. Markus Gritsch says:

    The Amiga didn’t use a SID chip. The chip there was named Paula (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Original_Chip_Set#Paula) and used DMA to play digital samples.

    Stereo SID tunes are rare, while not really adding that much value. However, maybe you want to take a look at this project I recently finnished. It uses a real SID chip to generate the sound: http://dangerousprototypes.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=56&t=2197

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