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Topic: My HAKKO classic and T12/T15 soldering controller (Read 292835 times) previous topic - next topic

Re: My HAKKO classic and T12/T15 soldering controller

Reply #45
Is it ESD safe ?

And what alternatives can I use for the sr580's ?

Re: My HAKKO classic and T12/T15 soldering controller

Reply #46
[quote author="highpow3rpc"]Is it ESD safe ?

And what alternatives can I use for the sr580's ?[/quote]

It is up to you if it will be ESD safe or not. If you connect the outer body of the soldering iron to earth/ground, it will be ESD safe. Most soldering irons, including T12 tips and handle, have separate wire for this.

SR580 is just a 5A 80V schottky rectifier. Any 60-80V fast or schottky rectifier will do the job. Schottky is a better choice because the forward voltage drop is smaller.

For example, there is SB580 availavle in Farnell, which is more or less the same as SR580.

Re: My HAKKO classic and T12/T15 soldering controller

Reply #47
I will have a look at what I can find its more about availability alot of the components for projects I look at making aren't very readily available and in most cases I am not sure how to determine a component which can be used in place,

With this design does the sensor board (sleep stand) need to be used or will the circuit function without it say if it had a bridge across a pin to pull it high or low ?

Re: My HAKKO classic and T12/T15 soldering controller

Reply #48
All the components can be bought from Farnell, Mouser, Digikey etc.

...and, yes, the controller can work without sensor. It automatically determines if there is or there is not sensor attached. It also has an option in the menu for the sensor - on, off or auto(default).

The sensor just sends 0 or 5V to the controller to indicate if iron is in the stand. Same can be done with a simple SPDT switch.

Re: My HAKKO classic and T12/T15 soldering controller

Reply #49
[quote author="sparkybg"]All the components can be bought from Farnell, Mouser, Digikey etc.

...and, yes, the controller can work without sensor. It automatically determines if there is or there is not sensor attached. It also has an option in the menu for the sensor - on, off or auto(default).

The sensor just sends 0 or 5V to the controller to indicate if iron is in the stand. Same can be done with a simple SPDT switch.[/quote]


Does the sleep stand set the iron to go to a idle temp if so what temperature

By my understanding if I had a SPDT switch sleep pin tied to ground with a 4.7k resistor and then had the switch pulling it high to 5v, does there need to be anything else done to the controller eg. having other pins that would normally be designated to the sensor tied in any way ?

Re: My HAKKO classic and T12/T15 soldering controller

Reply #50
The temperature in the stand, the sleep temperature and the time before the controller goes to sleep are all options in the menu, so you can set them to whatever you want.

The controller just wants 0V when iron is in the handle and 5V when iron is outside the handle. How you will achieve this is entirely up to you.

Re: My HAKKO classic and T12/T15 soldering controller

Reply #51
Thanks heaps sparkybg,

I am looking at making the boards myself but curious as to where you got your boards done or did you do etch them yourself.

Re: My HAKKO classic and T12/T15 soldering controller

Reply #52
I am using local bulgarian company for my two layer PCBs and iteadstudio for 4 layer PCBs. The controller PCB has many vias and it will be a bit hard to fabricate at home. Etching is not a problem, but solder mask and hole metalisation definitely are something not so easy to make at home.

Re: My HAKKO classic and T12/T15 soldering controller

Reply #53
Ok I might look at designing my own board including the power supply and control board in one, the vias aren't a problem as I can put a pin through and pads on both sides.

Re: My HAKKO classic and T12/T15 soldering controller

Reply #54
Coming soon: V2:
- USB link for firmware updates, live data preview, instrument profile programming etc.
- can measure any thermocouple with more than 4mV @ 500 degrees celsius
- can measure resistive sensors - 3uA - 12.25mA measuring current - this means any resistance between 0.5ohm and around 5 kiloohm can be measured with around 1% error. Heater resistance can also be measured.
- variable hardware amplifier gain form 4 to 1024.
- variable 10 bit hardware offset
- internal ambient temperature sensor
- can run on 10-30V DC or AC(45-65Hz). Safe for automotive use - can withstand upto 60-70V voltage peaks.
- maximum power limitation - measures input voltahe and heater resistance - can control low power iron safely.
- instrument identification - can use resistor divider or 1-wire Flash to identify plugged instrument.
- 64k onboard Flash for storing instrument profiles
...

Re: My HAKKO classic and T12/T15 soldering controller

Reply #55
Hello spakybg,

great project you have here!

You mentioned that you had a later version of the firmware than the one on the first page, could you possibly post the updated version that also had support for the JCB tips?  I'm just looking for the improved PID regulation, as I'm setting out to modify a fake Hakko 951, want it to be better than the original, and possibly even help people like neslekkim who got a raw deal when ordering what they tought to be a real original. I must say, they're not all bad, works pretty good considering.... If you can live with having to calibrate it yourself... duh..!

Internally they are built quite similarly to your controller, with some shortcuts and differences like not being synced to the AC period, but they regulate quite OK, albeit only on 50% power. My version, and neslekkims at least, are actually using old schools DIP chips, so I'm going for something like a drop in replacement with a, but probably on a small board for some pin rearrangement with an RS232 or USB connection and a sync input.

Re: My HAKKO classic and T12/T15 soldering controller

Reply #56
For JBC C245 you have to remove the filter capacitors of second channel (the channel for external TC), and set ADC reference to 2.048 volts instead of 4.096. Of course the PID coefficients should be different, and here they are:

in PID.h:
Code: [Select]
#define PID2_TIME 1
#define PID2_DGAIN 11
#define PID2_KP 0.4
#define PID2_KI 0.01

Re: My HAKKO classic and T12/T15 soldering controller

Reply #57
So the only difference was the PID coefficients, excellent! You mentioned that this also made the T12 tips regulate faster, but I suppose that that would still be with the same old 4.096 V reference?

I'm trying to figure out how your firmware works, and you have been quite good at documenting the variables and flow for the interrupt part, but the meaning of several of the main variables and some of the functionality, especially the button trickery, escapes me, could you maybe document them just as thoroughly, or perhaps give me some hints on what they do?

Re: My HAKKO classic and T12/T15 soldering controller

Reply #58
I am on vacation now. I will do my best to explain next week.

Re: My HAKKO classic and T12/T15 soldering controller

Reply #59
I'm considering new soldering station for my shop. After reading this thread I'm considering three options:
1) Do what OP did: purchase BK3000LF, build a controller, get FX-9051 handle
2) build a custom controller and get a JBC handle + tips
3) purchase JBC CD-2BC (I can get a set with 4 tips for around €340)

Pricing for those options:
1) BK3000LF €65, FX-9051 handle €40, controller - unknown, T12 cartridge set - €40 = €145 + price of the controller. From what I was checking - OSHPark priced the boards at about €65 for a set of three, so that's €210 + parts
2) BK3000LF + boards €130, parts unknown, JBC handle + 5 cartridges €160, total €290 + cost of the controller parts
3 )JBC CD-2BC €290 with handle and two tips, additional 3 tips €65

So practicality says that the only options left are 1) and 3). Can anyone tell me how does the T12 with this controller compare to CD-2BC (or BB in that matter)?