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Topic: What breakout do you need/want? (Read 105826 times) previous topic - next topic

Re: What breakout do you need/want?

Reply #45
Yes, I understand there are many LPC1343 breakout boards available. Most of them are over priced. I wanted to make DIP breakout of these inexpensive ARM Cortex M3/M0 .

My design goals were :
1.Free Software drivers -  API compatible with either arduino / mbed.
2.Use Qt Creator as cross-platform IDE with GCC.
3.Provide some 5v Compatible I/Os using cheap N-Mosfets.

I did build a prototype to test if LPC1343 can be flashed with GNU/Linux and Windows(as LPC1343 enumerates as Mass Storage Device). It can be programmed with GNU/Linux  as well with mcopy - I have written a documentation at http://dangerousprototypes.com/docs/LPC ... ootloaders.

NXP provided drivers are not compatible with any free-opensource license. Hence we would have to write everything from scratch. But ATMEL provides BSD/MIT style licensed drivers for their ARM Cortex-M3. Hence I thought it would be better to wait for Atmel SAM3N.

I have a picture of my prototype available at http://garden.seeedstudio.com/index.php ... dBoard.JPG

Re: Re: What breakout do you need/want?

Reply #46
[quote author="ian"]
Quote
Why not 100 pins?

Soon :) We started with these, and a new update will be available eventually.[/quote]


can i suggest an 144pin plus ,  could be fun to put a XC95288XL on it :-)

Re: Re: What breakout do you need/want?

Reply #47
144 is on the way :)
Got a question? Please ask in the forum for the fastest answers.

 

Re: Re: What breakout do you need/want?

Reply #48
with so many arm headers and dev boards (olimex, etteam, mbed, maple ...) I'm not so sure "just header / breakout board" would be very profitable ... and doing a whole kit with examples and tools pre-set ain't a small job .. you get maple from seeed for 47$ (with arduino like ide) and imho the best arm dev board for 40$ from futurlec (made by etteam) .. some "header" solutions from olimex: LPC2103, LPC2106 - DIP.. also some interesting dev kits from them LPC2919 with 8x1 lcd and sd socket, LPC2378 Ethernet, USB, 2x CAN, 2xRS232, ETHERNET, SD/MMC, AUDIO IN-OUT, gfx lcd..., and super cool STM32F103ZE AND 3.2" COLOR LCD WITH TOUCHSCREEN :)

for e.g. something like this last one from olimex but cheaper would be super cool (olimex price is 84EUR) but again, I can't say how profitable will it be, and it would require bunch of examples for different compilers .. (gcc minimum) ..

Re: What breakout do you need/want?

Reply #49
Registered just to comment on ARM breakout boards.

I would love to see a simple STM32FXXX series breakout board. You can get a STM32VLDiscovery board for around 8 dollars that can act as a cheap SWD programmer, but I've found absolutely zero simple, cheap bare bones breakout boards for the STM32 line of chips that I would feel comfortable buying and putting in a finished project.

olimex boards are ok, but still over priced, 20-30 euros for a simple STM32 breakout board. Plus, the big JTAG header could be replaced by the smaller, SWD.

Would also be nice to buy a bare PCB without the chip on it.

Re: What breakout do you need/want?

Reply #50
[quote author="John"]Registered just to comment on ARM breakout boards.

I would love to see a simple STM32FXXX series breakout board. You can get a STM32VLDiscovery board for around 8 dollars that can act as a cheap SWD programmer, but I've found absolutely zero simple, cheap bare bones breakout boards for the STM32 line of chips that I would feel comfortable buying and putting in a finished project.

olimex boards are ok, but still over priced, 20-30 euros for a simple STM32 breakout board. Plus, the big JTAG header could be replaced by the smaller, SWD.

Would also be nice to buy a bare PCB without the chip on it.[/quote]

I like that idea! In the meantime though, If you're comfortable with soldering the IC's yourself, you could get one of DP's xQFP breakout boards, solder the ic, and you'd already be halfway there!

Re: Re: What breakout do you need/want?

Reply #51
Hey how about a ExpressCard PCB?

Re: Re: What breakout do you need/want?

Reply #52
[quote author="frank26080115"]Hey how about a ExpressCard PCB?[/quote]Oh, do you mean an ExpressCard PCB with protoboard-style solder pads so you can add any chip you want and plug it in to an ExpressCard slot?  That sounds cool.  Seems like you would need an ExpressCard interface chip to make it work, but there might be more than one flavor out there - in other words, the choice of ExpressCard chip could impact what options are available.  Then again, I know nothing about what options there are.

Do you have any suggestions for ExpressCard chip sets?

Re: What breakout do you need/want?

Reply #53
I can't think of anything to do with the actual PCIe bus, but I thought it might be cool to be able to make something using the USB bus, but hidden inside my laptop. Something like a LED bargraph showing CPU load, or a hardware password manager.


Re: Re: What breakout do you need/want?

Reply #55
cool, I already have my own version done using USnooBie and a bargraph on a breadboard, I should really document it

or... since everybody and their dog has a smartphone except me... a pager motor vibrator for a laptop? need to look up the current I can suck through the expresscard slot later

Re: Re: What breakout do you need/want?

Reply #56
I too would be interested in a basic (maybe DIP) ARM breakout board. I figure that when you're ready to move on from the basic AVRs or arduino style, you probably have enough of a project in mind that it makes sense to go for one of the higher end processors - if you don't intend to go in for mass production, it's easier to have the extra resources rather than saving pennies.

Interesting links from Viswesr - the LPC ARMS look easy to program and get started with, and that ultra basic breakout looked good, except not breadboard compatible (full square set of pins).

Perhaps something with a 3v3 regulator and crystal built in (and usb brought out to a connector), and pins spaced DIP style. Should be a decent step up in horsepower and RAM from atmega328/644 (and presumably the hobbyist style PICS?), but also easy to get started with because of the preprogrammed bootloader, and fairly cheap.  Any thoughts?

Re: Re: What breakout do you need/want?

Reply #57
I'd also second the idea of a logic level translator breakouts - I'll build myself a couple of MAX3000 breakouts when the parts arrive to translate 5V-3v3 for SD card and GPS (currently using 4050s instead), and another for 5V to 1.8v for the more recent accelerometer/compass breakouts (I2C needs bidirectional shifters). Don't know if such design might be a bit too easily duplicated by a hobbyist themselves though to be worth DP's effort.

I think I can post links now, so here's a sort of AVR32 equivalent of the ARM DIP breakout I had in mind and mentioned in the previous post:
http://core.st/projects/AVR32_Starter_Kit/index.html



[sorry for the large picture!]

Re: What breakout do you need/want?

Reply #58
Micrathene,

It was a general purpose LQFP breakout board similar to http://dangerousprototypes.com/docs/Dan ... _breakouts , which I got from local store. Unfortunately, I could not get a breadboard compatible xQFP proto board.

There is a N-MOSFET based bidirectional level converter design by Herman Schutte of NXP
(http://ics.nxp.com/support/documents/in ... n97055.pdf) . This is a cheap and best solution. It is good for serial buses like I2C. But, can not be used for pulled-up / pulled-down ports pins.

Ian,

We could also have xQFP proto-boards compatible with breadboard(DIP).

Re: Re: What breakout do you need/want?

Reply #59
[quote author="Micrathene"]I figure that when you're ready to move on from the basic AVRs or arduino style, you probably have enough of a project in mind that it makes sense to go for one of the higher end processors[/quote]...
Quote
Should be a decent step up in horsepower and RAM from atmega328/644 (and presumably the hobbyist style PICS?), but also easy to get started with because of the preprogrammed bootloader, and fairly cheap.  Any thoughts?
I'm not really sure of everything you're saying here, so no offense if I read it wrong.  On the one hand, there seems to be an implication that ARM is higher end than AVR.  But you also seem to imply that PIC is 'hobbyist' compared to ATmega.  On the other hand, you could be lumping only some of the PIC options in with some of the AVR options.

In any case, I just wanted to jump in and point out that AVR and PIC both have "high end" processors that would compete well with ARM.  You won't find these 32-bit processors on an Arduino (yet?), but it doesn't mean Atmel and Microchip don't have evaluation boards that would be just as useful.

A custom USB Device would be a decent mid-level project for some folks, but the Arduino is fairly crippled for this.  They're only just now getting around to using the better AVR chips with built-in USB, but they still haven't put out a single-chip USB AVR board.  There are PIC platforms which are thus a step up from Arduino in this respect because they at least have USB that can do something besides emulate a serial port.  I also agree that the preprogrammed bootloader available in some AVR chips makes them potentially much easier to get started, and so I'd say it would be great to have an affordable Dangerous Prototypes board based on an AVR with built-in USB, including the Atmel USB bootloader.