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Topics - hak8or

1
Project logs / Hello again! Embedded system inspired by Henrik + an update.
First things first, I took my site offline a year or so ago and have been putting up getting a new version back up. I finally decided to just stick it in a subdomain and update all (yes, all of them, or all of them except the ones I accidentally missed) the links here to point to the new site, archive.hak8or.com. Apologies for them being down for so long. It's actually running behind an nginx server using docker on Digital Ocean, here is the dockerfile.



Secondly, I figured that since I updated the links, might as well throw this up here for those who don't read reddits /r/electronics subreddit. My embedded linux system has had an initial documentation pass and is up! I am still writing a new CMS for my site, so it doesn't have proper documentation yet, but this should hopefully be enough to get started for anyone who wants to do something similar.

There was also tons of information in the following reddit discussion for those interested.

So, yeah, hello again! :P

Aw, I just realized phpbb doesn't support markdown. :(
2
Project logs / A day of soldering and Scavanging
Hello everyone! :)

While I started to dabble in my next project, I realized that I did not post up my most recent project! I wanted to get some better experience with the new hot air station, and the only way to get that is to actually de-solder some stuff, so here it is! It is not fully done yet, but I would like to post what I have so far for any possible comments or mention of something not working for someone.

http://archive.hak8or.com/projects/Scav ... age_1.html

My favorite picture of this entire day would be this guy:
[attachment=0]
3
Project logs / Writeup template suggestions and Xray update
Hello Dangerous Prototypes again! :D

It has been a long time since I was here, due to being on vacation for a while with very unreliable internet, so I am back in (hopefully) full force. I continued work on a writeup template for electronic projects, and I would like to share it with the DP community for any possible suggestions and if anyone is interested.

The template is on my github: https://github.com/hak8or/hak8or-site

I also set up a wordpress theme based on my website in the form of a blog, so if anyone wants to use my theme with wordpress for a blog or anything else, feel free to use it! :) It is in the folder on github called TOOLS/WP_THEME. You make a folder in your themes in wordpress and then upload the contents of the WP_THEME folder into it.

So far I have a google maps ish viewer for boards that you would want to zoom in a lot without having to load the entire image. Its main purpose is to be able to zoom in on objects that have lots of fine detail while not limiting the viewer to just one section of the image. I used Pano3js for this, and the script that they supplied did not work well at all, like it names the files in the wrong order, so I added in a script of my own that renames all the files correctly, which I uploaded to github in "tools" if I am not mistaken. *Uploaded just now actually* I will show how to use the scripts later in a blog post and readme text file added to the site. Also, I put in a documentation ideas text file which includes all scripts and tools that I came in contact with while searching for what ever I needed at the time, and all the top contenders I had for scripts and other items for the website. It may prove very useful if you are planning to do a website like this yourself, as I also included notes on which ones are not that good for what we want them to do.

I am also deciding on what license to use for the site and associated tools, but a major slow down is I don't know if I can license the website itself and associated stuff with what ever license I want considering I am using software like super-sized which uses a GPL/MIT license. So, for the time being, the website and all its content is licensed as do what ever you want with it, even if it makes you money, as long as you give credit where credit is due.

Now comes up the actual writeup page. It is not done yet, but I did fix and spelling and grammar mistakes that I found, but I might have missed some. It is a continuation of the Xray machine that I found right before summer, and a closer look at the sensor and its associated boards. It is a continuation of the earlier thread, viewtopic.php?f=56&t=3945

The link to the actual teardown page is http://archive.hak8or.com/projects/Xray ... age_1.html
You can also get to the writeup by going to the homepage http://hak8or.com and scrolling down to the Xray Teardown tab thing and clicking on "writeup'.

I am very open to any and all suggestions and opinions on the current writing style, layout, colors, and what ever else you may comment on. My main target right now is avoiding a wall of text while still being easy to read, so layout comments are welcome! Also, I am very happy to be back on DP! :) I already have a queue of projects to post up, like the fixing of an LCD, scavenging parts from old computers, (hopefully) a youtube video showing how I get some macro shots, and more!

In short, hello DP again, I am glad to be back. :)
4
Project logs / Xray machine tear down (56k no no) 4-29-12
I was on my way to get food for my girlfriend and myself, chicken over rice with pee-ta bread in this case, while she was busy doing work for college, which meant I could walk alone and, low and behold, it was garbage day! Good thing she was not with me, or else she would wear gloves around me and have barrels of anti bacterial soap after she saw the things I lug back. :P Anyways, I was walking, enjoying the potential finds on every tinkerers (who does not mind dirty stuff) weekly holiday, in the states at least. This big shiny object catches my eye, so I walk closer, and it has a lever, and some lights. Big, shiny, lights, and a lever, good enough for me! So I haul it back to my house after checking for any liquids and stuff like that, set it down in a place no one will fall over it, and go make a dash for the food, as maybe twenty minutes passed already.

Well, that was two days ago, and just today I had some free time to take a closer look at it. I took apart best I can for now, and will continue later, but in the meantime I took a huge amount of pictures, so I have to sift through all of them now, and I got a few ideas on a new way of showing the pictures for you guys, all of which will take a while to turn into a real thing instead of just an idea in my head. So, for now, I will provide a little teaser for you guys in case you read this far and are still interested. Feel free to guess what it may be!


http://http://i.imgur.com/W8Yq7.jpg
6
Project logs / LCD TV "tear down" and fixing (56k)
Here is the gallery! http://archive.hak8or.com/projects/Dell_Tv_Fix/

As you all can tell, I have been working on my printer thing lately, which has been going well until I found out that I can't find my working pickit2 anywhere. Well, in the meantime, my girlfriend decided to get rid of her two tv's and a few other electronics, which for me is one of the most awesome things anyone can say, 2nd only to "I'm full, do you want to finish this"? (1) Anyways, back to what I was saying! The lcd's are both not powering up all the way, and the best part is that the lcd's are not cracked. If the LCD is cracked you can pretty much use it only for parts, buying a LCD panel costs more than the entire lcd unit usually, and you can't really fix a cracked LCD. So, with someone helping me carry the HUGE lcd back to my place, we carried it into my basement and I got to work.
(1)http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ooChw1NLizo 2:00

The one on the left is the smaller Dell, and the one on the right is from a company I never heard of, but it has not bad reviews on amazon so I presume it does not suck and it is worth the effort to fix it.
http://http://archive.hak8or.com/pictures/Dell_Tv_Fix/P1250671.JPG


First of, the Dell monitor. It is smaller, looks cooler, and seemed like an easier fix. (The big TV did not even have the power light on, the little guy had a power light at least)
http://http://archive.hak8or.com/pictures/Dell_Tv_Fix/P1250677.JPG


Side view
http://http://archive.hak8or.com/pictures/Dell_Tv_Fix/P1250680.JPG


Back view
http://http://archive.hak8or.com/pictures/Dell_Tv_Fix/P1250682.JPG


Model model for all those interested.
http://http://archive.hak8or.com/pictures/Dell_Tv_Fix/P1250683.JPG


Some certifications for the people who want to know. :P
http://http://archive.hak8or.com/pictures/Dell_Tv_Fix/P1250684.JPG


Back of the unit with the back case off.
http://http://archive.hak8or.com/pictures/Dell_Tv_Fix/P1250686.JPG


Guts!! Left is the power board and the larger right board is the "logic" board. Power boards in tv's usually have one or two large caps rated for 400v+ (Mains rectification) and then a bunch of smaller caps grouped together for each of the voltage rails. Mosfets with large heatsinks are the switchers in these power boards (most are SMPS due to better efficiency), and the yellow colored rectangles are the transformers. The two coils on the bottom of the power board are for (I think) just filtering.
http://http://archive.hak8or.com/pictures/Dell_Tv_Fix/P1250705.JPG


Close up of the power board. Nothing seems wrong here, the caps look a TINY bit bulging, but that is pretty much all of them, and I am getting power to the power diode which means the processor is running, so I am guessing the voltage rails are fine. Upon closer inspection with my multi meter and scope it seemed to be indeed running fine.
http://http://archive.hak8or.com/pictures/Dell_Tv_Fix/P1250710.JPG


The entire thing is insulating with a huge high heat conductivity "mat"! I have never seen such a huge amount used before, especially to insulate the entire board. Instead, I saw it used for heat conducting pads between ram ic's and v'regs in motherboards and graphic cards like the 8800GT, but it was only a small thin sheet.
http://http://archive.hak8or.com/pictures/Dell_Tv_Fix/P1250712.JPG


One thing that caught my eye was this. It is the board that has audio jacks on the side. I don't know what those inductors are meant to do as I don't dabble with audio, but I presume it is also for filtering? Also, Dell uses LG components in their tv's! I didn't know that!
http://http://archive.hak8or.com/pictures/Dell_Tv_Fix/P1250695.JPG


Also, Dell had a really interesting satellite adapter! I still need to check if it is a VGA with some data pins, or just a data connector with a VGAish connector. How nice of them to label the pins though!
http://http://archive.hak8or.com/pictures/Dell_Tv_Fix/P1250699.JPG


Pin labeling
http://http://archive.hak8or.com/pictures/Dell_Tv_Fix/P1250698.JPG


Back of the satellite dongle
http://http://archive.hak8or.com/pictures/Dell_Tv_Fix/P1250701.JPG


Close up of the logic board. I see the genesis chipset very often in flat panels, but as always I can never nab the datasheet on it. I never saw a V chip like that though, bottom right. The satellite dongle is under the metal cover on the top left of the board. Also, you can spot that there is a non connected VGA foot print with its associated passives. I could probably add in the third input if only I had access to the processor on this board.
http://http://archive.hak8or.com/pictures/Dell_Tv_Fix/P1250708.JPG



Now, lets get to trying to fix this guy. Here is the left most CCFL PCB, what things do you spot first?
http://http://archive.hak8or.com/pictures/Dell_Tv_Fix/P1250702.JPG

Some charring near the caps, specifically the top left most cap, some charring near the mosfet legs, and only one high voltage wire. I was dumbfounded as to how they got the CCFL's running with a wiring setup like that, as the datasheet for the CCFL driver  has a different application circuit than actually implemented, which for me happens very rarely. Edit: Explanation here http://http://goo.gl/Honjp

Close up on the CCFL driver ic and other circuitry. Upon a closer look, you can notice that they labeled the connectors! That is SO awesome! It made finding out what is wrong infinity easier, and if something goes wrong later, then at least I will have a better idea on what does what so I can quickly find what went wrong.
http://http://archive.hak8or.com/pictures/Dell_Tv_Fix/P1250703.JPG


Another angle for the board.
http://http://archive.hak8or.com/pictures/Dell_Tv_Fix/P1250722.JPG


When you look closer, it seems like it is just left over flux, but why is it specifically around the components that are interacting with the higher voltages? Edit: Explanation here http://http://goo.gl/Honjp
http://http://archive.hak8or.com/pictures/Dell_Tv_Fix/P1250731.JPG


The other cap
http://http://archive.hak8or.com/pictures/Dell_Tv_Fix/P1250732.JPG


Something interesting I found while probing around. This is the gate on one of the mosfets for the CCFL driver. 1 us per division and 5 volts per division. Looks normal, right?
http://http://archive.hak8or.com/pictures/Dell_Tv_Fix/P1250736.JPG


Here it is with .1 us per division and I think it was 1 volt per division. I never saw ringing like that before. IT seems to have the first ring right after the gate drops to 0v, a bit of nothing, a sharp ring drop, then another larger ring, then .35 us of nothing again, and then a very large ring out of nowhere, nothing, small ring, then nothing again. Any ideas on why the ringing stops, comes back again, and then stops again? Especially the sudden out of nowhere ring with a huge 2v drop. I am open to any ideas!
http://http://archive.hak8or.com/pictures/Dell_Tv_Fix/P1250738.JPG


How I had it all connected.
http://http://archive.hak8or.com/pictures/Dell_Tv_Fix/P1250739.JPG


After cleaning up the dirty PCB spots and getting rid of the left over flux .... Tadaa !! Of course I had to take a picture of how dangerous prototypes looks on this tv, since I am putting this on the forum. :P Much to my surprise, my contact message thing shows up on the front page of dangerous prototypes! I sent it yesterday I think and after a few hours it wasn't put on the front page nor a response, so I thought it wasn't worth the mention, but I guess I was wrong. :P One LCD down, one more to go!
http://http://archive.hak8or.com/pictures/Dell_Tv_Fix/P1250748.JPG


I am currently working on putting up a image gallery of sorts on my site (http://http://www.hak8or.com), I will update my threads slowly with the link to the appropriate image gallery along to where you can get the source code for it. I have used up ten gig of bandwidth this month so far, which is much higher than what I usually get, awesome!
7
General discussion / Bravia LCD teardown (56K warning)
Thought I might transfer my post from hackaday here, as I would much rather support these forums and dangerous prototypes than hackaday, not to mention I would like to keep this information available for people to view. If this counts as cross posting or anything like that please tell me and I will immediately get rid of it.


I found this old Bravia in the garbage a block from my house on the way to school one morning, so off course, me being me, I decided to be late for my Spanish class by 10 minutes to drag this monster back to my house.

It was out in the rain for a few hours, and the power cord was cut. It seemed to be working fine when I got it out of the garbage, but when I attached a power cable to it, the LCD itself was cracked in two spots, looked like someone threw two wiimotes at once at it. :P

Anyways, since the LCD itself was cracked, I decided to see what was in it through the means of tearing it down. I don't have too much pictures because my camera was almost dead, so I will show you what I have so far. Under each picture is a link to the original, in case anyone wants to see the full resolution picture. The reason for hosting it on my own website is because I do not want to use any other image hosts, also because I just got a web hosting thing from hostable.com for only a dollar for three years, this is a way of testing it.

The back light of the TV, it is a large amount of ( I think?) CCFL tubes, correct me if I am wrong. :P They seem to be very sturdy on the left side, but loose on the right side, I think it is because the only way the tubes are attached on the right side is to the high voltage CCFL connectors.

http://8486.a.hostable.me/pictures/BRAVIA/DSC_0179.JPG



This is the high voltage CCFL board.
You can actually see the connectors to the CCFL tubes, and it seems to only separate the electricity into 16 paths (One per CCFL tube). There are two connectors for the high voltage from the transformer on the power board, but only one of them is actually used, I don't know why they would use up money for the 2nd connector if they are not using it, but oh well, another free connector. :P
TOP

http://8486.a.hostable.me/pictures/BRAVIA/DSC_0184.JPG
Bottom

http://8486.a.hostable.me/pictures/BRAVIA/DSC_0189.JPG



This is the board that has two very thin cables connecting it to the LCD itself (TOP), and a single connector to the main logic board (bottom). A quick look at it shows a RAM chip (on the right, rectangular IC), and a main processing chip in the middle. The reasoning for it being a ram chip is the traces are squiggly, which is to make the timing per trace as equal as possible to the other traces to the RAM chip. You can find traces like this on your RAM sticks and on your motherboards. I did not find any information on the main chip, but I am guessing it is some sort of chip that takes in data from the logic board, and spits out signals for the Horizontal and Vertical parts of the board?
TOP

http://8486.a.hostable.me/pictures/BRAVIA/DSC_0198.JPG
BOTTOM

http://8486.a.hostable.me/pictures/BRAVIA/DSC_0199.JPG
BOTTOM HI RES SCAN
http://8486.a.hostable.me/pictures/BRAVIA/PCBSCAN_1.jpg



Now is the actual image stuff! On the top there was a LCD, and a black piece of plastic on the edges of the entire unit. I took out the LCD first, and here is how it looks :P It is cracked so I did not bother handling it carefully or anything, just laid it down on my desk to take a picture. I think it is the heaviest component of the TV, excluding the metal frame of the TV. It is quite thin, and very fragile, if you are moving this and you want the LCD to work, be sure to NEVER pick it up with the faces going up or down, always lift it on its side so you do not crack the lcd under its own weight.


http://8486.a.hostable.me/pictures/BRAVIA/DSC_0215.JPG



One of the cracks on the LCD. Very hard to get the camera to focus on the crack and not on the reflection. :P What I did for this was get the camera to focus on the PCB (Half press) and then pointed the camera a bit to the right so it will get the right lighting for seeing the crack on the LCD and took the picture (Full press)

http://8486.a.hostable.me/pictures/BRAVIA/DSC_0237.JPG



This is the entire back light put back together without the LCD itself. You can see the black plastic frame around it to keep everything together.

http://8486.a.hostable.me/pictures/BRAVIA/DSC_0245.JPG



The back light has a few layers on it, as do all the LCD displays I gutted as well. This one has four layers specifically, so here they are.

http://8486.a.hostable.me/pictures/BRAVIA/DSC_0204.JPG



As you can see, the first (top layer) is the thickest. It seems to have the texture similar to certain cheap plastic shower walls. It is a bit thick, not too flexible, and one side is less reflective than the other.

http://8486.a.hostable.me/pictures/BRAVIA/DSC_0205.JPG

You can actually see all the small ridges. I do not know what purpose the ridges serve, so I cannot comment on that.

http://8486.a.hostable.me/pictures/BRAVIA/DSC_0206.JPG



Here are the three layers under the top layers. They are a little heavy, and seem to be as thick as transparent sheets for projectors, if not a bit thicker.

http://8486.a.hostable.me/pictures/BRAVIA/DSC_0209.JPG



That is it for all the pictures I have :P I will have more pictures up, and will scan the thin boards with my scanner to give you all some more high res shots of the PCB's.
I intend to use the back light thing as a very well light desk surface so I can see through PCB's easily, or using it as a very big even lamp for my desk, with uniform lighting, but I am not sure which I will do. Another thing that I intend to do with this is to poke around in the main logic board, as I have heard that these things run some form of Linux.

Thanks for making it through all my horrible writing and meh pictures, I hope they were a good use of your time :P Keep in mind, I may have made mistakes, most probably did actually, so please correct me when you find any.
8
General discussion / BK precision 3011B tear down (56K warning)
Hello everyone! I did not know that there might be an interest in the components of function generators, but thanks to the latest thread of a function generator tear down (birthday gifts to myself,  sqkybeaver), I decided to join in on the fun!

I got this function generator off ebay for fifty dollars including shipping, and it arrived all working. If it was in spec or not I am not exactly sure, but on my scope it seemed well within operating condition.

So, here are some pictures! :D
Edit: woops, pictures were down, they should be up now!


http://http://archive.hak8or.com/pictures/BK_functiongen_teardown/P1250575.JPG
Here is what it looks like usually, just sitting on the scope.


http://http://archive.hak8or.com/pictures/BK_functiongen_teardown/P1250576.JPG
Close up!


http://http://archive.hak8or.com/pictures/BK_functiongen_teardown/P1250577.JPG
It does actually work, 20 Khz square waves look good on the scope.


http://http://archive.hak8or.com/pictures/BK_functiongen_teardown/P1250585.JPG
Bottom of the function generator.


http://http://archive.hak8or.com/pictures/BK_functiongen_teardown/P1250586.JPG
Back of the function generator.


http://http://archive.hak8or.com/pictures/BK_functiongen_teardown/P1250587.JPG
Inside top cover of the function generator, you can see the shielding that they used.


http://http://archive.hak8or.com/pictures/BK_functiongen_teardown/P1250586.JPG
Inside the bottom cover of the function generator, more shielding.


http://http://archive.hak8or.com/pictures/BK_functiongen_teardown/P1250594.JPG
Top of the PCB plus other pcb's


http://http://archive.hak8or.com/pictures/BK_functiongen_teardown/P1250596.JPG
Back of the PCB plus other pcb's


http://http://archive.hak8or.com/pictures/BK_functiongen_teardown/P1250590.JPG
It has the same "switch" for switching from 240v to 120v as sqkybeaver's function generator, it is really cool!


http://http://archive.hak8or.com/pictures/BK_functiongen_teardown/P1250593.JPG
They even have a fuse "modifier" thing for the different voltages!


http://http://archive.hak8or.com/pictures/BK_functiongen_teardown/P1250597.JPG
A fuse from one of the inputs or outputs, I forget which one it was.


More to come tomorrow or after tomorrow! :D
9
Project logs / YAUP: Dell Printer teardown for PCB making (56K warning)
I found a good acronym for my projects! Yet  Another  Unfinished  Project
Mostly because I never finish the projects I start, heh. :P

Anyways, I found two printers in the garbage, one is a HP that does not seem bad while the other is a dell. I checked the reviews of both printers online on amazon and I found the dell to be apparently the worst printer in the universe, so I decided to take it apart since using it as a printer will probably bring endless frustration, not to mention the cartridges were empty. Oh yeah, the person throwing it out did not leave the power supply for the printer in anywhere close by.

So I took apart the printer and here is a simple write up to a lot of pictures!

http://http://archive.hak8or.com/pictures/HP_Printer_Teardown/20111218-IMG_20111217_233716.jpg
This is the printer I will be taking apart. Main thing about this printer that interests me is the DPI:  4800 x 1200
More information about the printer: http://http://www.staples.com/sbd/img/rebates/pdfs/718342.pdf


http://http://archive.hak8or.com/pictures/HP_Printer_Teardown/20111218-IMG_20111217_233731.jpg
A close up of the printer to show what model it is. Even the screen itself is not worth salvaging! :P


http://http://archive.hak8or.com/pictures/HP_Printer_Teardown/20111218-IMG_20111217_233746.jpg
The scanner ontop. A huge amount of room in there between the glass and bottom plastic, far more than needed for the scanner heard to move, I wonder why there is so much room in there. Maybe to just have the dell logo at the perfect angle or something? :P


http://http://archive.hak8or.com/pictures/HP_Printer_Teardown/20111218-IMG_20111217_233803.jpg
Closeup of the rod and scanner head connection. You can see the little "pulley" (I do not know what the string with teeth on it is called) too! My guess is that the scanner head is moved along by being pulled by the pulley and using the rod as a stationary point to prevent it from wobbling around too much.


http://http://archive.hak8or.com/pictures/HP_Printer_Teardown/20111218-IMG_20111217_233852.jpg
Taking the scanner off was incredibly easy! There were three screws in the back of the printer near what you can see what the hinges that held the scanner on. After unscrewing those I was able to, with lots of wiggling, get the scanner head off. There were about four connectors attached to the scanner portion of the printer, two of which are FPC (Flat Pin Connectors), and the other two being normal molex connectors.


http://http://archive.hak8or.com/pictures/HP_Printer_Teardown/20101216-P1250442.JPG
The two FPC's and molex connectors. I presume the inductor (black tube holding 2 wires together, bottom left connector) is for power filtering, but I am not sure.


http://http://archive.hak8or.com/pictures/HP_Printer_Teardown/20101216-P1250443.JPG
The PCB connectors for the above cables. What is interesting for me is the holes in the plastic cover of the PCB. I presume the holes are for air movement from the motor drivers and not just aesthetic because the printer is not processor intensive and has the power supply separate from the printer.


http://http://archive.hak8or.com/pictures/HP_Printer_Teardown/20101216-P1250439.JPG
As this is an inkjet printer, the tiny holes for the cartridge sometimes clog, so inside most if not all inkjet printers there is a "sponge". What you see hear is the sponge that cleans the cartridge head of gunk that might get stuck on it. The cartridge goes over this sponge and it pushes against the print head to take off dried ink and anything else that might get stuck on it after use. In some printers there is actually a puddle of ink in the container, you can search for yourself on youtube or just googling to see just how much ink goes in some of these areas.


http://http://archive.hak8or.com/pictures/HP_Printer_Teardown/20101216-P1250441.JPG
I used a flat head to push the cover off the printing part of the printer, much how you use a credit card to open other plastic electronic cases. Of course, there were a few screws I had to unscrew to open it, but if anyone is trying to open something plastic and you are sure that all the screws are unscrewed, just stick a flat head along the edges and separate the plastic walls. Sometimes you can slide the plastic walls apart by pushing the walls in parallel directions (left or right), though I had that happen to me only once.


http://http://archive.hak8or.com/pictures/HP_Printer_Teardown/20101216-P1250445.JPG
Here is the left side of the printer that has a pretty nifty printer head cleaning system going on. The orange walls you see brush against the print head getting rid of ink that is stuck. Then the rectangles you see seem to push against the print head, so I guess when the printer is turned off this is where the cartridges go, and the little rectangles form an air tight seal around the cartridge head to prevent ink from drying and clogging up the heads. The left rectangle is for the black cartridge, and the right rectangle is for the color cartridge. Either way, it is a very cool little contraption, especially because when the print head slides to the left it causes the entire assembly to lift up against the print head. Also, a bit blurry but still able to make out, you can see a little optical sensor in the bottom middle of the picture (clear plastic), I assume its function is detecting if the cartridge is actually present in the printer.


http://http://archive.hak8or.com/pictures/HP_Printer_Teardown/20101216-P1250444.JPG
Some ink splattered on the wall of the printer, I presume the print head maintenance is a rather messy process. :P


http://http://archive.hak8or.com/pictures/HP_Printer_Teardown/20101216-P1250446.JPG
This is the motor that controls the linear motion of the cartridge. I was hoping for it to be a stepper motor but it turned out that it is only a DC motor, which are not precise at all. Luckily, this printer has optical encoders so it isn't as bad as I feared. But, what is that thin strand there !? And that paper thing under the motor?


http://http://archive.hak8or.com/pictures/HP_Printer_Teardown/20101216-P1250452.JPG
My god! It is hard to make out in this picture but there was a hairpin in there with some hair (the strand above the motor was a piece of hair), a gum wrapper, and some tiny specs of what I guess is food or seeds. I have no idea how that even got in there, the printer was rather well sealed.


http://http://archive.hak8or.com/pictures/HP_Printer_Teardown/20101216-P1250454.JPG
This is the optical encoder for the paper feed of the printer. As you can see, it says 150 Lpi and 892 CPR. Now, here is some short simple math to find the precision of the paper feed.

150 LPI = 150 Lines Per Inch
1 inch / 150 = 6.66666667 mil

892 CPR = 892 Counts Per Inch
6.66666667 mil X 892 CPR = 5946.66666964 mil

5946.66666964 mil = 5.94666666964 inch

Circumference of optical encoding disk  = 5.94666666964 inch
Circumference / Pi = Diameter of disk
5.94666666964 inch / Pi = 1.89288279 inch

The shaft that pulls/pushes the paper is 0.5 inch diameter
0.5 X Pi = 1.57079633 inch
6.66666667 mil / 5.94666666964 inch = X / 1.57079633 inch
1.76098243 mil = X

So I can feed paper in steps of 1.76098243 mil.


http://http://archive.hak8or.com/pictures/HP_Printer_Teardown/20101216-P1250456.JPG
Here is the encoder tape for the linear motion of the print heads. I did not find anywhere the specs of this line, but I will find out later easily by just moving the print head a set distance and seeing what the optical encoder spits out.


http://http://archive.hak8or.com/pictures/HP_Printer_Teardown/20101216-P1250457.JPG
Surprisingly, just unscrewing 3 or 2 screws I was able to get the entire printer assembly out of the plastic case.


http://http://archive.hak8or.com/pictures/HP_Printer_Teardown/20101216-P1250459.JPG
Awesomeness! Now, to continue with the printer and seeing what I could put where. I need to be able to make a makeshift attachment in the printer cartridge holder to hold a thin needle or a small marker, and get rid of the angled paper feed. Unfortunately the paper feed is very thick plastic so I have to find out what to do with that.


http://http://archive.hak8or.com/pictures/HP_Printer_Teardown/20101216-P1250464.JPG
Close up of the black printer head. I left the color printer head somewhere and can't find it, heh, it will show up eventually!
10
Project logs / Some artistic sense from electronic parts!

http://http://www.8486.a.hostable.me/pictures/P1250215.JPG

While I was waiting for something to happen, and I had a large amount of things on my desk, I decided to just put them together and ended up making two little people, heh. I am not sure if this should even be put in "project logs", so please move this thread if needed!

It is incredibly difficult to solder 0402 leds onto tiny copper solid core wires without causing the led on the other end of the led to desolder. Another challange is soldering on that super thin copper wire to the smd leds, you sometimes can't even see the tiny wire! :P

Thank god for my makeshift "loupe" which is basically a camera lens backwards, I used it to make pictures in my previous post.
11
Project development, ideas, and suggestions / Power supply using a 2U rack chassis (56K warning)
Post on my website: http://archive.hak8or.com/

I saw a post about using magnetic fields on the human brain to get certain reactions, and the first thing that popped to my head was trying it out myself.
http://http://hackaday.com/2011/08/15/controlling-muscles-with-high-intensity-magnetic-pulses/

So, I started to get my old capacitor bank up and running again, which is basically 3 X 7 200V capacitors. I forgot the capacitance on each, but I think it was 2200 uF. Then I realized that I needed a high voltage source. I was about to go make a voltage multiplier for getting Mains to a high enough voltage for the bank, but I finally came to the conclusion that I should make a proper voltage source. So I took one my old finds, a video scale thing. It has a large amount of FPGA's but after a while of thinking I found that I would have no use for such a FPGA based unit, so I took out the boards and started working on the power supply. I did off course save the boards in case they would ever come in handy for something else. :P

Here is how the unit looks.

http://http://archive.hak8or.com/pictures/Power_supply_BIG/P1250084.JPG

http://http://archive.hak8or.com/pictures/Power_supply_BIG/P1250086.JPG

Here is what the inside of it looks like. There was another board ontop that also had more FPGA's, but I took it out a long time ago to try to get access to the JTAG pins. It is rather heavy, and I will tell you why later. I will say now though, it was a major surprise!

http://http://archive.hak8or.com/pictures/Power_supply_BIG/P1250087.JPG

Here it is without the PCB inside. It has a power supply which gives me -10v, -5v, gnd, +5v, and +10v. I am going to keep that board inside the unit for powering the digital circuitry, since I suppose it should give a nice clean +5v with ample current, for running all those FPGA's. I need to check it on my scope with a dummy load sooner or later. Sorry for the dark picture. For all my pictures I have been using a point and shoot (DMC-TZ3) and trying to not use flash at all. So far, none of my pictures have used flash! That gives me the macro shots of the boards without the horrendous flash blaze. A tripod is essential. :P

http://http://archive.hak8or.com/pictures/Power_supply_BIG/P1250091.JPG

While working on the front of the unit, I wanted to see about drilling holes and a slot for another display, a few buttons, and a few more leds. The chassis itself is spot welded together. The front panel itself was rather heavy after I took it off the rest of the unit, and here is why.

http://http://archive.hak8or.com/pictures/Power_supply_BIG/P1250092.JPG

Wait for it ....

http://http://archive.hak8or.com/pictures/Power_supply_BIG/P1250093.JPG

Holy .. !! It is a solid metal slab, an entire 3/4 of an inch of metal! I am guessing they used laser cutters for it, or something like that, because there is no way on earth I will be able to drill through that with a drill. I am now working on what MCU to use, how to set up a front panel with it (Planning on using a VGA monitor), where to get the connectors for different voltages, and what I want from this unit. Things like that. All my attention will be currently dedicated to this for now. Once I get a satisfying result from this, I will continue working with the little robot thing a ma bob, and then on a desk light using a LCD with CCFL tubes I found a long time ago.

Any comments are welcome! Thanks for reading :)
12
Project logs / Power supply using a 2U rack chassis (56K warning)
Post on my website: http://archive.hak8or.com/

I saw a post about using magnetic fields on the human brain to get certain reactions, and the first thing that popped to my head was trying it out myself.
http://http://hackaday.com/2011/08/15/controlling-muscles-with-high-intensity-magnetic-pulses/

So, I started to get my old capacitor bank up and running again, which is basically 3 X 7 200V capacitors. I forgot the capacitance on each, but I think it was 2200 uF. Then I realized that I needed a high voltage source. I was about to go make a voltage multiplier for getting Mains to a high enough voltage for the bank, but I finally came to the conclusion that I should make a proper voltage source. So I took one my old finds, a video scale thing. It has a large amount of FPGA's but after a while of thinking I found that I would have no use for such a FPGA based unit, so I took out the boards and started working on the power supply. I did off course save the boards in case they would ever come in handy for something else. :P

Here is how the unit looks.

http://http://archive.hak8or.com/pictures/Power_supply_BIG/P1250084.JPG

http://http://archive.hak8or.com/pictures/Power_supply_BIG/P1250086.JPG

Here is what the inside of it looks like. There was another board ontop that also had more FPGA's, but I took it out a long time ago to try to get access to the JTAG pins. It is rather heavy, and I will tell you why later. I will say now though, it was a major surprise!

http://http://archive.hak8or.com/pictures/Power_supply_BIG/P1250087.JPG

Here it is without the PCB inside. It has a power supply which gives me -10v, -5v, gnd, +5v, and +10v. I am going to keep that board inside the unit for powering the digital circuitry, since I suppose it should give a nice clean +5v with ample current, for running all those FPGA's. I need to check it on my scope with a dummy load sooner or later. Sorry for the dark picture. For all my pictures I have been using a point and shoot (DMC-TZ3) and trying to not use flash at all. So far, none of my pictures have used flash! That gives me the macro shots of the boards without the horrendous flash blaze. A tripod is essential. :P

http://http://archive.hak8or.com/pictures/Power_supply_BIG/P1250091.JPG

While working on the front of the unit, I wanted to see about drilling holes and a slot for another display, a few buttons, and a few more leds. The chassis itself is spot welded together. The front panel itself was rather heavy after I took it off the rest of the unit, and here is why.

http://http://archive.hak8or.com/pictures/Power_supply_BIG/P1250092.JPG

Wait for it ....

http://http://archive.hak8or.com/pictures/Power_supply_BIG/P1250093.JPG

Holy .. !! It is a solid metal slab, an entire 3/4 of an inch of metal! I am guessing they used laser cutters for it, or something like that, because there is no way on earth I will be able to drill through that with a drill. I am now working on what MCU to use, how to set up a front panel with it (Planning on using a VGA monitor), where to get the connectors for different voltages, and what I want from this unit. Things like that. All my attention will be currently dedicated to this for now. Once I get a satisfying result from this, I will continue working with the little robot thing a ma bob, and then on a desk light using a LCD with CCFL tubes I found a long time ago.

Any comments are welcome! Thanks for reading :)
13
Project development, ideas, and suggestions / Rover, gutting a Sony Bravia, and yesterday (56k warning)
Hello everyone! :)

I am working on making a rover thing so I can finally have a mobile car that I can use for things such as just driving around, scaring my cat, and learn some things about mobile electronics such as battery power, power usage, motor drivers, and wireless data transmission. So far, I have the chassis found out for sure, it is from a toy car I found lying on the side of the road for garbage collection. I, as any tinkerer would have done, took it home to see what I could use from it. :P

This is what I will be using for the robot chassis.

http://http://archive.hak8or.com/pictures/Robot/P1250096.JPG

The battery I will be using to power it, also taken from someone else's garbage. I think it should be enough to last (7.5 Ah and 12V) for a while, it is very durable, and should be able to handle the peak currents for the motors because it is (I think so at least) a lead acid battery.

http://http://archive.hak8or.com/pictures/Robot/P1250094.JPG

http://http://archive.hak8or.com/pictures/Robot/P1250095.JPG

One battery fits in snugly. I might add in a 2nd because I have seven of these batteries lying around, might as well use them for something.

http://http://archive.hak8or.com/pictures/Robot/P1250098.JPG

I do not know what micro controller I will be using for sure, but most likely it will be either a pic24F or a pic18f452, since I have both lying around.
*have to be added in*

Now, here is what I am going to be using for data transmission, since I always wanted to try using this as well as I have a few cordless phones lying around because they are so abundant on trash days. This is what it looks like on the outside, simple one handset phone with a base station. Unfortunately the headset battery was missing, but I was planning on running the entire robot off the battery anyways.

http://http://archive.hak8or.com/pictures/Robot/P1250060.JPG

Here is what it looks taken apart.

http://http://archive.hak8or.com/pictures/Robot/P1250061.JPG

You can actually see the RF part of it that handles the wireless data transmission. It is encased in the metal enclosure, to prevent the RF from flooding out in the wrong places, which would cause problems with the FCC certification. I am not sure though, so anyone feel free to correct me if I am wrong!

http://http://archive.hak8or.com/pictures/Robot/P1250062.JPG

A close up of the module. I would want to try to just de solder the module and connect directly to it instead of through the board, but I have no idea what the pin outs are yet. I also cannot find any identification stickers or other information as to the make or model of the module. Also, a quick thing I have noticed on a large majority of boards I have seen for the past few months, almost all of them have tear drops instead of the simple trace to component. Is it usual to have components with tear drops instead of the simple trace to component, or am I into some lucky streak?

http://http://archive.hak8or.com/pictures/Robot/P1250069.JPG

Side of the RF module. It is clear that the module is the metal enclosure on a PCB, which was then soldered onto another PCB. I have never seen such a thing in the wild. Is it normal to include a pre engineered turn key solution in large scale production items? I thought these types of modules are used only in low quantity items, or prototypes.

http://http://archive.hak8or.com/pictures/Robot/P1250070.JPG

Here is something that really caught my eye right away when I flipped the board that had the RF module on it. An Atmel MCU! Any ideas for what the white this that surround part of the Atmel chip are meant for? I think it may be to cause more difficulty reverse engineering the board or something like that, because it is very hard to find where the via's or traces go under the white solder mask/silkscreen. Also, the sticker thing on the chip to the left of the Atmel chip is very unusual, I never saw something like it before. You think that it is something soft and you can peel it off, but it turns out to be some very hard material, that feels like sandpaper almost. I have no idea what it is meant for. Is it meant to keep someone from finding out what chip it is, or to help give off heat from the chip? I have no idea, any suggestions would be welcome.

http://http://archive.hak8or.com/pictures/Robot/P1250065.JPG

I tried to get the sticker thing off the chip because I was incredibly curious as to what it was hiding. I feared that it will be nearly impossible to get it off without damaging the chip, but it turned out that a just tapping it with a Flathead will result in it chipping away. Very gentle tipping mind you. This causes me to further have no idea what it is meant for, if it is so easily taken off without damaging the chip.

http://http://archive.hak8or.com/pictures/Robot/P1250071.JPG

A minute or two later of Flathead tapping and a tissue gives me this. I have yet to google for the datasheet or this chip or find anything out about it, but I guess that it takes the analog value from the microphone or land line, converts it to digital (like an ADC), and then does some compression or other things that a Digital Signal Processor would be good for.

http://http://archive.hak8or.com/pictures/Robot/P1250072.JPG

The cat that will get horrified at a driving rover thing that is about the same size as itself. He really likes to sit in the chair I just stood up from for some reason, no idea why. Also likes to stare at me doing this type of stuff.

http://http://archive.hak8or.com/pictures/Robot/P1250073.JPG

Something else I found on the board was a EEPROM, I guess for holding phone number favorites and stuff like that. I am currently working on seeing what is on the chip with my bus pirate. The EEPROM is a AT24C32AN, here is a datasheet . http://catalog.gaw.ru/project/download.php?id=2843

http://http://archive.hak8or.com/pictures/Robot/P1250079.JPG

Here is my bus pirate I am using for getting the contents of the EEPROM. I took the schematic from the original bus pirate, got rid of some stuff, changed some stuff, and made it a bit smaller. I should have used a SMD pic24f, but oh well. I mainly made it to break out a FT232 and practice making PCB's and soldering. This was my first PCB I designed and soldered, and 0402 components were not THAT bad, just need a steady hand and good eyes. :P

http://http://archive.hak8or.com/pictures/Robot/P1250082.JPG

=======================================================================
I was considering putting my old post into this one, but realized that it would make the first post very very long, so I will just link to it from Hackaday Forum.
http://forums.hackaday.com/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=1023 <-- Stuff I did yesterday (LOTS of pictures)
http://forums.hackaday.com/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=605 <-- The Sony Bravia gutting (LOTS of pictures as well)
14
Project logs / Rover, gutting a Sony Bravia, and yesterday (56k warning)
Hello everyone! :)

I am working on making a rover thing so I can finally have a mobile car that I can use for things such as just driving around, scaring my cat, and learn some things about mobile electronics such as battery power, power usage, motor drivers, and wireless data transmission. So far, I have the chassis found out for sure, it is from a toy car I found lying on the side of the road for garbage collection. I, as any tinkerer would have done, took it home to see what I could use from it. :P

This is what I will be using for the robot chassis.

http://http://archive.hak8or.com/pictures/Robot/P1250096.JPG

The battery I will be using to power it, also taken from someone else's garbage. I think it should be enough to last (7.5 Ah and 12V) for a while, it is very durable, and should be able to handle the peak currents for the motors because it is (I think so at least) a lead acid battery.

http://http://archive.hak8or.com/pictures/Robot/P1250094.JPG

http://http://archive.hak8or.com/pictures/Robot/P1250095.JPG

One battery fits in snugly. I might add in a 2nd because I have seven of these batteries lying around, might as well use them for something.

http://http://archive.hak8or.com/pictures/Robot/P1250098.JPG

I do not know what micro controller I will be using for sure, but most likely it will be either a pic24F or a pic18f452, since I have both lying around.
*have to be added in*

Now, here is what I am going to be using for data transmission, since I always wanted to try using this as well as I have a few cordless phones lying around because they are so abundant on trash days. This is what it looks like on the outside, simple one handset phone with a base station. Unfortunately the headset battery was missing, but I was planning on running the entire robot off the battery anyways.

http://http://archive.hak8or.com/pictures/Robot/P1250060.JPG

Here is what it looks taken apart.

http://http://archive.hak8or.com/pictures/Robot/P1250061.JPG

You can actually see the RF part of it that handles the wireless data transmission. It is encased in the metal enclosure, to prevent the RF from flooding out in the wrong places, which would cause problems with the FCC certification. I am not sure though, so anyone feel free to correct me if I am wrong!

http://http://archive.hak8or.com/pictures/Robot/P1250062.JPG

A close up of the module. I would want to try to just de solder the module and connect directly to it instead of through the board, but I have no idea what the pin outs are yet. I also cannot find any identification stickers or other information as to the make or model of the module. Also, a quick thing I have noticed on a large majority of boards I have seen for the past few months, almost all of them have tear drops instead of the simple trace to component. Is it usual to have components with tear drops instead of the simple trace to component, or am I into some lucky streak?

http://http://archive.hak8or.com/pictures/Robot/P1250069.JPG

Side of the RF module. It is clear that the module is the metal enclosure on a PCB, which was then soldered onto another PCB. I have never seen such a thing in the wild. Is it normal to include a pre engineered turn key solution in large scale production items? I thought these types of modules are used only in low quantity items, or prototypes.

http://http://archive.hak8or.com/pictures/Robot/P1250070.JPG

Here is something that really caught my eye right away when I flipped the board that had the RF module on it. An Atmel MCU! Any ideas for what the white this that surround part of the Atmel chip are meant for? I think it may be to cause more difficulty reverse engineering the board or something like that, because it is very hard to find where the via's or traces go under the white solder mask/silkscreen. Also, the sticker thing on the chip to the left of the Atmel chip is very unusual, I never saw something like it before. You think that it is something soft and you can peel it off, but it turns out to be some very hard material, that feels like sandpaper almost. I have no idea what it is meant for. Is it meant to keep someone from finding out what chip it is, or to help give off heat from the chip? I have no idea, any suggestions would be welcome.

http://http://archive.hak8or.com/pictures/Robot/P1250065.JPG

I tried to get the sticker thing off the chip because I was incredibly curious as to what it was hiding. I feared that it will be nearly impossible to get it off without damaging the chip, but it turned out that a just tapping it with a Flathead will result in it chipping away. Very gentle tipping mind you. This causes me to further have no idea what it is meant for, if it is so easily taken off without damaging the chip.

http://http://archive.hak8or.com/pictures/Robot/P1250071.JPG

A minute or two later of Flathead tapping and a tissue gives me this. I have yet to google for the datasheet or this chip or find anything out about it, but I guess that it takes the analog value from the microphone or land line, converts it to digital (like an ADC), and then does some compression or other things that a Digital Signal Processor would be good for.

http://http://archive.hak8or.com/pictures/Robot/P1250072.JPG

The cat that will get horrified at a driving rover thing that is about the same size as itself. He really likes to sit in the chair I just stood up from for some reason, no idea why. Also likes to stare at me doing this type of stuff.

http://http://archive.hak8or.com/pictures/Robot/P1250073.JPG

Something else I found on the board was a EEPROM, I guess for holding phone number favorites and stuff like that. I am currently working on seeing what is on the chip with my bus pirate. The EEPROM is a AT24C32AN, here is a datasheet . http://catalog.gaw.ru/project/download.php?id=2843

http://http://archive.hak8or.com/pictures/Robot/P1250079.JPG

Here is my bus pirate I am using for getting the contents of the EEPROM. I took the schematic from the original bus pirate, got rid of some stuff, changed some stuff, and made it a bit smaller. I should have used a SMD pic24f, but oh well. I mainly made it to break out a FT232 and practice making PCB's and soldering. This was my first PCB I designed and soldered, and 0402 components were not THAT bad, just need a steady hand and good eyes. :P

http://http://archive.hak8or.com/pictures/Robot/P1250082.JPG

=======================================================================
I was considering putting my old post into this one, but realized that it would make the first post very very long, so I will just link to it from Hackaday Forum.
http://forums.hackaday.com/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=1023 <-- Stuff I did yesterday (LOTS of pictures)
http://forums.hackaday.com/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=605 <-- The Sony Bravia gutting (LOTS of pictures as well)
15
Project logs / Bus pirate with FT232 breakout
A long time ago when I was making a board for my friend, the PCB area required for her board left me with a bit of space, so I decided to make a bus pirate with a breakout for the FT232 chip and make it a bit smaller.

So here it is!
http://8486.a.hostable.me/pictures/P1240888.JPG
http://8486.a.hostable.me/pictures/P1240890.JPG
2.25 X 1.25 inches

Yes I know quite a bit is wrong with it, for example I never cleaned the flux off and the soldering of the DIP pic seems weird. The soldering is weird because the holes are the wrong size, I made the holes the exact same size as the pins, so the pins would not fit into the hole. I ended up using a very thin strand of wire and putting it through the hole and onto the pin side, and soldered it that way, and it worked :P
Also, the FT232 chip has a reset pin, and I attached it incorrectly, and I couldn't just knife the trace off on the PCB, so I ended up getting rid of the pin entirely, hence a missing pin.

I also realize that a lot of the passive components are soldered crookedly and whatnot, but you try to solder a 0402 component with tweezers, jittery hands, and an over sized soldering iron tip! :P

All in all, it was a good learning experience and luckily I learn from my mistakes :P