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Pro mini logger project for the classroom

Posted on Tuesday, January 29th, 2019 in Arduino, DIY by DP

cavepearlproject-600

Edward Mallon writes:

Dr. Beddow’s instrumentation class has been building the 2016 version of the Cave Pearl datalogger for more than three years, and feedback from that experience motivated a redesign to accommodate a wider range of student projects while staying within the time constraints of a typical lab-time schedule. The rugged PVC housing from the older build has been replaced with an inexpensive pre-made box more suitable for “light duty” classroom deployment. The tutorial includes a full set of youTube videos to explain the assembly. We hope this simplified build supports other STEM educators who want to add Arduino-based experiments to their own portfolio of activities that develop programming and “maker” skills.

Via the comments.  More details on Underwater Arduino Data Loggers blog.

This entry was posted on Tuesday, January 29th, 2019 at 3:00 pm and is filed under Arduino, DIY. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can skip to the end and leave a response. Pinging is currently not allowed.

One Response to “Pro mini logger project for the classroom”

  1. A teacher friend asked us for faster build that was less dependent on soldering because they didn’t have the budget for that kit. So we’ve developed a “minimum build” using pre-made Dupont jumper cables (as we did in 2016) to reduce the assembly time to about 1 hour. I’ve also added support to the code base for using the indicator LED as a light sensor, so they can use the logger with their existing curriculum even if they don’t get their students to the point of adding extra sensors.

    https://thecavepearlproject.org/2019/02/21/easy-1-hour-pro-mini-classroom-datalogger-build-update-feb-2019/

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