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Learn phonemic speech synthesis for the Propeller

Posted on Thursday, March 29th, 2012 in code, Parallax Propeller by the machinegeek


This tutorial from Parallax explains speech synthesis for the Propeller chip. The circuit is simply a speaker plugged into the audio jack on the Propeller Board of Education (though any Propeller dev board should work; the demo program assumes the speaker is connected to Pin 10.) The demo is known as SimpleTalk.spin and uses the bundled libraries talk, VocalTract and timing. It says Hello and Goodbye. The included talk_demo program provides more samples of vocalizations to help you get the idea of how word pronunciations are coded. The tutorial is a simple introduction sure to pique your interest in the amazing speech possibilities provided by the Propeller.

You can read all the project details and download the demo code and libraries from the Learn.Parallax.com speech synthesis page.

This entry was posted on Thursday, March 29th, 2012 at 5:00 pm and is filed under code, Parallax Propeller. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can skip to the end and leave a response. Pinging is currently not allowed.

One Response to “Learn phonemic speech synthesis for the Propeller”

  1. Drone says:

    Yes, any Propeller board with a 5MHz crystal and 80MHz clock speed will work. But you need a buffer/LPF to convert the PWM audio output which samples at ~20 KHz. Looking at the schematic, the Board of Education (BoE) uses a single op-amp LPF. I think the BoE filter may be a Sallen-Key unity gain non-inverting 2nd-order Butterworth LPF with an ~18KHz corner frequency. The voice output is mono. You will need an amplified speaker or high-Z headphones to listen to the output. The speaker shown in the picture above is the battery powered Veho 360 amplified speaker sold by Parallax.

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