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Parallax introduces laser range finder

Posted on Saturday, October 8th, 2011 in measurement, open source, sensors by the machinegeek

Parallax has introduced the Laser Range Finder.

“Designed in conjunction with Grand Idea Studio, the Parallax Laser Range Finder (LRF) Module is a distance-measuring instrument that uses laser technology to calculate the distance to a targeted object. The design uses a Propeller processor, CMOS camera, and laser diode to create a low-cost laser range finder. Distance to a targeted object is calculated by optical triangulation using simple trigonometry between the centroid of laser light, camera, and object.”

It operates on 5 VDC at 150 ma and has a 4-pin (0.1″ spacing) header for interfacing power, ground, and TTL-level serial IO.

The schematic, BOM and related files on this open source project can be found at the LRF product downloads section. A chronology of this project’s development can be found in the Parallax forums.

The LRF is Parallax item #28044 and lists for $129.99.

This entry was posted on Saturday, October 8th, 2011 at 3:30 pm and is filed under measurement, open source, sensors. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can skip to the end and leave a response. Pinging is currently not allowed.

One Response to “Parallax introduces laser range finder”

  1. Shadyman says:

    That’s hilariously awesome.

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