NExuS project

in Arduino by DP | 0 comments

IMG_20150708_204853

Adam over at Maniacal Labs has written up documentation on his NExuS weekend project:

My main desires for this build was that the NES look completely stock and unchanged from the front and that original, unmodified, NES gamepads worked via the original gamepad ports. Fortunately, this turned out not to be too bad. First, I needed all the extra parts that would allow me to break out power, network, and video for the Nexus player, and to hook up some extra peripherals. Some I already had lying around, some I had to order but for all parts, these are the exact items:

  • microUSB to microUSB Extension Cable
  • IEC320 C7 Socket
  •  Ethernet Coupler
  • 8″ HDMI Extension
  • Right Angle microUSB Cable
  • microUSB Ethernet Adapter and USB Hub

Also needed were:

  • NES Gamepad Hookup PCB (more on this below)
  • M4-0.7 screws (10-16mm length)
  • Printed brackets (more on this below)
  • 16 AWG Wire
  • Female 2-prong socket end
  • Hot Glue
  • Quick Set Epoxy
  • Low Grit Sandpaper

Project details at Maniacal Labs project page.

2.2 or 2.4 or 2.8 inch SPI TFT LCD ILI9341 to Arduino Uno

in Arduino, Interface by DP | 0 comments

Arduino+to+2.8+LCD+schematic.bmp

Bob Davis  has written an article on interfacing a 2.8 inch SPI TFT LCD ILI9341 with the Arduino Uno:

Over the weekend I figured out how to interface a 2.8 inch SPI TFT that has a ILI9341 chip to an Arduino Uno.  All it takes is eight 1K resistors.  Most people use a 4050 IC.  Here is the schematic
I am using the Adafruit ILI9341 driver found at github
Note that the Adafruit LCD has level shifters for 5 volts built into it.

More details at Bob Davis’ blog.

Check out the video after the break.

Continue reading →

#FreePCB via Twitter to 2 random RTs

in Free PCBs by DP | 0 comments

buspiratev383

Every Tuesday we give away two coupons for the free PCB drawer via Twitter. This post was announced on Twitter, and in 24 hours we’ll send coupon codes to two random retweeters. Don’t forget there’s free PCBs three times a every week:

  • Hate Twitter and Facebook? Free PCB Sunday is the classic PCB giveaway. Catch it every Sunday, right here on the blog
  • Tweet-a-PCB Tuesday. Follow us and get boards in 144 characters or less
  • Facebook PCB Friday. Free PCBs will be your friend for the weekend

Some stuff:

  • Yes, we’ll mail it anywhere in the world!
  • Check out how we mail PCBs worldwide video.
  • We’ll contact you via Twitter with a coupon code for the PCB drawer.
  • Limit one PCB per address per month please.
  • Like everything else on this site, PCBs are offered without warranty.

We try to stagger free PCB posts so every time zone has a chance to participate, but the best way to see it first is to subscribe to the RSS feed, follow us on Twitter, or like us on Facebook.

The factory of the world – Hackaday documentary on the Shenzhen Ecosystem

in documentation, interviews by DP | 0 comments

The factory of the world – Hackaday documentary on the Shenzhen Ecosystem

When it comes to manufacturing, no place in the world has the same kind of allure as the Pearl River Delta region of China. Within just an hour-long train ride, two vastly different cultures co-exist, each with its unique appeal that keeps attracting engineers, entrepreneurs, and hustlers alike. On the mainland side, cities like Shenzhen and Guangzhou bring the promise of cheap components, low-cost contract work, and the street cred of “having done the Shenzhen thing.” And on the island, the capitalist utopia called Hong Kong glows with all of its high finance and stories of lavish expat lifestyles.
As the “new” China evolves, it seems like it’s exactly the convergence of these two cultures that will bring the biggest change—and not just to the area but to the whole world. Still, understanding what exactly is going on and what the place is really all about remains a mystery to many. So, this June, we jumped on the bandwagon and headed east, trying to get our own feel for the whole thing.

Via Hackaday.

LM2596 DC-DC converter module testing

in testing by DP | 1 comment

LM2596Module

Kerry D. Wong writes:

In the video below, I tested this DC-DC converter board under various operating conditions and measured its efficiencies. To conclude, these switching regulator boards are well suited for low to medium current draw digital circuitry but for higher current applications a heat sink is needed and even so I would not recommend running it at the maximum 3A load especially if the input voltage is high.

Check out the video after the break.

Continue reading →

DIY csCNC – 2 (Linistepper driver and testing with Bus Pirate)

in Bus Pirate, DIY, tools by DP | 0 comments

diy-linistepper-4

Oakkar7 has a nice build log on his DIY csCNC, he writes:

Since I started building DIY CNC, I checked the free, opensource motor controller. There are several alternatives. I chose linisteppr controller.
– Simple and cheap (my first priority :) ) and I can source required parts locally
–  microstepping, open design (Especially, it’s PIC16F628A based. I’m PIC guy and a lot 16F628A in my stock)
Build log is fast, simple and straight. I used a simple perfboard for faster development.

After building the driver, I tested it with my buspirate using PWM function for generating stepping pulse. I started with 1kHz and increased to 4 kHz.

Project details at Oakkar7 blog.

App note: Designer’s guide for the Si114x

in app notes by DP | 0 comments

an_siliconlabs_an498

Si114x proximity sensors from Silicon Labs design guide. Link here

This application note provides an outline for using the Si114x proximity detector and ambient-light sensor. General considerations of electrical and optical component selection, programming, and power consumption are explained so as to cover the majority of situations.

Free PCB Sunday: Pick your PCB

in Free PCBs by DP | 44 comments

IRToy

We go through a lot of prototype PCBs, and end up with lots of extras that we’ll never use. Every Sunday we give away a few PCBs from one of our past or future projects, or a related prototype. Our PCBs are made through Seeed Studio’s Fusion board service. This week two random commenters will get a coupon code for the free PCB drawer tomorrow morning. Pick your own PCB. You get unlimited free PCBs now – finish one and we’ll send you another! Don’t forget there’s free PCBs three times every week:

Continue reading →

Posted in Free PCBs | Tagged | 44 Comments

App note: Touchless lavatory appliance design

in app notes by DP | 0 comments

an_siliconlabs_an522

Using the Silicon Labs’s Si1141 sensor and C8051F9xx series microcontroller for touchless lavatory. Link here

The Si1141 is a single-channel, reflectance-based proximity detector with an integrated ambient light sensor and can be used as a touchless sensor IC in lavatory appliances. As a proximity detector, the Si1141 has two infrared photodiodes, flexible ADC integration time, and multiple signal ranges. In addition to the configurable ADC sensitivity configuration settings, the Si1141 can dynamically drive an irLED with anywhere from 6 to 400 mA. This high level of flexibility in the ADC, photodiode choice, and irLED drive strength all contribute to allow the end product to operate under various ambient light conditions.

Building a CC2500 to BLE adaptor

in PCBs, project logs by DP | 0 comments

pcb

Don has been working on a CC2500 to BLE adaptor project, that is available on Github:

Posting some details in response to questions about the current module.  Everything for the CC2500 is on Github.  Fish around here and you’ll also find some iOS and Pebble code.  Sorry, nothing Android based.
The RFDuino is programmed like any other Arduino, it’s worthwhile to use their usb shield.  The CC2500 is controlled via SPI(from the RFDuino), there’s nothing to program.

Project info at Don’s blog.

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Free PCB coupon via Facebook to 2 random commenters

in Free PCBs by DP | 0 comments

KHOS-2-3-4-5-6P

Every Friday we give away some extra PCBs via Facebook. This post was announced on Facebook, and on Monday we’ll send coupon codes to two random commenters. The coupon code usually go to Facebook ‘Other’ Messages Folder . More PCBs via Twitter on Tuesday and the blog every Sunday. Don’t forget there’s free PCBs three times every week:

Continue reading →

More awesome DoorBell control

in DIY by DP | 0 comments

19756763728_783d52da30_o

Felix of LowPowerLab posted an update on his DoorBell Mote project  we covered previously:

My first DoorBell Mote prototype was working nicely and it allowed monitoring the door bell (while also triggering it remotely – toddlers love it). But I wanted more. On weekends the family likes to get a well deserved nap during the day and often those pesky solicitors ring the bell and wake everyone up. So naturally the doorbell has to be disabled also, without major effort or any disconnected wires. Sounds like the perfect addition to the Door Bell Mote. So I made a new revision and a proper PCB for this, below is the schematic with the changes and the proto PCB from OSHPark. Actually I made more changes to the schematic after putting together the PCB, so there are some differences. I’ve tried a LTV814H optocoupler for AC detection instead of the more expensive H11AA11, it works just as well, but both can be used on this PCB

Details at LowPowerLab site.

Interfacing a chord keypad to Papilio Duo FPGA board

in DIY by DP | 0 comments

chord_pad

Ken writes:

This is a simple chord style keypad that I made up a few years ago.  It is loosely based on the Microwriter – an early UK designed portable keypad / notewriter.
The five main keys are located under the fingertips and thumb of the right hand, plus an additional shift key that can be held down with the thumb.  This combination allows up to 64 key combinations  – which is enough for simple ascii, alphas and numerals.
However, this time the application is not for text entry, but to allow very rapid access to menu items, tools and colour options for a CAD program – without having to break concentration and use the keyboard.

Project info at Ken’s SustainableSuburbia blog.

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STM32 Nucleo and DFU USB bootloading

in programmers, tools by DP | 0 comments

Nucleo_HIGLIGHT

MrMobileWill writes:

Over the last few months I have been playing with the Nucleo development boards from STMicroelectronics. If you’re unfamiliar with them, they are fast, mbed and Arduino (headers) compatible. This makes it easy like an Arduino to program and use. What sets them apart is that they are 32bit and have, depending on the model, tons of memory and flash. The Nucleo boards maintain the Arduino footprint but also have headers for the extra pins which gives this board plenty of GPIO for your projects.  In turn, you end up with multiple buses such as SPI, I2C, and UARTs for your consumption. They are priced very well and come in different flavors based on your needs. Each flavor is based on different ARM Cortex architectures such as M0, M3, and M4. One of the best features is real debugging via ST-Link/V2-1. The unfortunate thing due to the nature of mbed, you can only use the debugging features using a full desktop IDE such as Keil or some of the other free alternatives. But mbed allows you to export your code from the online IDE to the project format for those IDE’s. So there’s that.

More details at MobileWill’s project page.

Programmable 8-character LCD module and digital voltmeter

in project logs by DP | 5 comments

volmeter

A programmable 8-character LCD module and digital voltmeter project from Tuxgraphics:

Our 3 digit LED digital voltmeter module has been quite successful over the years. This new LCD module is basically an advanced version with a lot more capabilities. You can power it with the same voltage source that your signal is derived from. You can load your own code into this module but it has even some nice features for people who just need a voltmeter module and don’t want to play with C-code.

Project info at Tuxgraphics.

Files and source code are available at tuxgraphics.org.

Posted in project logs | Tagged , | 5 Comments

Wireless Dallas iButton reader

in software, wireless by DP | 0 comments

1-Wire-Protocol

Ondřej Karas writes:

This article describes simple wireless Dallas one-wire device ROM reader. It is intended as a base code for some more sophisticated access control system. We try some kind of access system in followings articles. Now, we are going to read 1-wire ROM code.
We use DDC-SE-01-dallas.c from DDC examples as a template for our project. In fact, we use functions for one-wire handling only and throw away the rest of the code. The main code periodically checks one wire device presence on DQ pin of IQRF module (PC3). If device is present, it checks, if previous readings was more than 1s ago, and then it reads ROM code, which is sent to another module. At the end of reading, startDelay(100) is executed and flag released = FALSE; is set. It’s protection against multiple reading.

Project details at DoItWireless site.

Review: Dirty Circuits Done Dirt Cheap

in DirtyPCBs.com by DP | 2 comments

DirtyBoards-p0

DirtyPCBs detailed review by Gee_Rabid_Inventor:

 Often design and research is and expensive business, especially when dealing with technology that your are unfamiliar with. A big proportion of this is PCB manufacture and I have spend a few years looking for a low cost reliable method for PCB production.
The most cost effective method is to have the boards produced overseas but then you won’t be sure of the quality of the boards until they return. This is where Dirty PCB step in.

Details at Gee’s blog.

Posted in DirtyPCBs.com | Tagged , | 2 Comments

App note: Anatomy of a high-quality meter

in app notes by DP | 4 comments

an_fluke_2140271

An application note from Fluke on best characteristics of a high-quality multimeters. Link here

The hazards of working with electricity aren’t new, of course. But as electronic and electrical systems become increasingly complex, the dangers of measuring its flow have increased and unprepared technicians can suddenly be faced with a simple job gone bad.
The key is selecting a meter with a high level of safety capabilities.

 

Posted in app notes | Tagged , , | 4 Comments

Free PCB Sunday: Pick your PCB

in Free PCBs by DP | 47 comments

IRToy

We go through a lot of prototype PCBs, and end up with lots of extras that we’ll never use. Every Sunday we give away a few PCBs from one of our past or future projects, or a related prototype. Our PCBs are made through Seeed Studio’s Fusion board service. This week two random commenters will get a coupon code for the free PCB drawer tomorrow morning. Pick your own PCB. You get unlimited free PCBs now – finish one and we’ll send you another! Don’t forget there’s free PCBs three times every week:

Continue reading →

Posted in Free PCBs | Tagged | 47 Comments