Making wine in Shenzhen: Nylon hex standoff kit

in Prototypes by DP | 9 comments

nylon_600

Often it’s not clear exactly what connector, button, switch, or part is the best choice for a project. We end up making a last minute order of 1 or 2 of any likely candidate from Mouser or Digikey. That sets the project off by about a week while we dig through datasheets and websites, make CAD footprints, and wait for the order to be delivered.

To banish this annoying time sink we’re working with Oomlout to release complete kits of parts. Each set will be nicely labeled, well organized, and have open source datasheets, renderings, and CAD footprints for Eagle and KiCAD. We call it wine making because Ian hand plucks each part from Huaqiangbei in Shenzhen. We’re posting now to get your feedback, the final kit will be available in a couple weeks.

Previously we presented the Single row cable kit, Keyed connectors kit, and the Double row IDC cable kit. Today we release our idea for the Nylon hex standoff kit. Recently we upgraded all our projects to the standard PCB sizes, and designed the Sick of Beige acrylic cases for them. The cases are held together with hex standoffs and bolts. The idea behind this kit is to always have on hand the right standoff or bolt you might need for a project.

Head below to check out the contents, then please let us know what we forgot or what you find useless!

standofFF15mm_nylon_600

Nylon female to female standoffs come in various sizes, and specifications. The ones we chose follow the common M3 standard.

  • 50x Nylon M3 nut (2.5mm)
  • 12x Nylon hex standoff Female-Female (5mm)
  • 12x Nylon hex standoff Female-Female (6mm)
  • 12x Nylon hex standoff Female-Female (8mm)
  • 12x Nylon hex standoff Female-Female (12mm)
  • 12x Nylon hex standoff Female-Female (15mm)
  • 12x Nylon hex standoff Female-Female (20mm)
  • 12x Nylon hex standoff Female-Female (30mm)

standofFM15mm_nylon_600

Nylon female to male standoffs come in various sizes, and specifications. The ones we chose follow the common M3 standard.

  • 12x Nylon hex standoff Female-Male (5mm)
  • 12x Nylon hex standoff Female-Male (6mm)
  • 12x Nylon hex standoff Female-Male (8mm)
  • 12x Nylon hex standoff Female-Male (12mm)
  • 12x Nylon hex standoff Female-Male (15mm)
  • 12x Nylon hex standoff Female-Male (30mm)

bolt12mm_nylon_600

To fix boards or cases to the standoffs we included M3 screws of various sizes.

  • 24x Nylon M3 screw (8mm)
  • 24x Nylon M3 screw (12mm)
  • 24x Nylon M3 screw (16mm)
  • 24x Nylon M3 screw (25mm)

Also included is a Philips head screwdriver, and a 5mm hex wrench.

Forgot something useful? Included the wrong stuff? Please let us know and we’ll update the contents before the kits are finalized.

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Comments

  1. robert says:

    Are the longer ones fully threaded?

  2. David Bley says:

    In my experience, the male part of a male-female (M-F) tends to break or strip before the screw, so I avoid these in my designs.

    • TheNick says:

      When prototyping a recent product, I ended up choosing nylon hardware for the initial design, moving over to stainless for the final product. Being able to purchase a single, 50mm nylon screw in bulk reduced the time it took to find the sweet spot for length for the application.

      Mocking up a design in cad was one thing, but once it came to assembling the final pieces of the prototype together and finding out that the screw ended up being a few mm short due to unforseen circumstances (read: PCB house provided a board that was wrong thickness, but ended up being a better for production) made me happy I had a screw I could easily adapt using nothing more then a pair of wire clippers.

      OTOH, nothing is more than a pain in production when ending up with the last out of ten fasteners snapping at the male end on a standoff.

  3. Sleepwalker3 says:

    I avoid Nylon screws/nuts period. They almost always bind up, seize up and snap the screw when trying to undo them, spin up and won’t undo, etc.

    • robert says:

      Plastic standoffs are fine, but you’ve got to use proper stainless steel screws. Either Allen or Torx. The Philips ones suck, no matter if plastic or metal.

      • Sleepwalker3 says:

        Try Posidrive or Superdrive, more flexibility than Torx and can be used with a phillips screwdriver Though Torx are really good, you tend not to find them in the middle of nowhere, when you desperately need one, so not great where you might need to undo them with non-specialised tools). In the case of Nylon screws, Phillips might be a good choice for Nylon, as common Nylon6 tends to be fairly slippery and Phillips do have a tendency to want to slip out under strain. I can only ever recall working with slotted nylon screws (which I’ve done a huge amount) and they are a pain. In many cases people want to go with Stainless because they think it’s better, but it’s grossly more expensive, very reactive and is a horrible material to work with. Sure most types of Stainless are good for corrosion resistance, but standard Zinc plated Steel is more than adequate in probably 95% of standard applications, doesn’t bind up and isn’t as reactive with other metals in general – It also tends to look brighter and more shiny if good quality plating. Stainless is good for specialised applications though (which may be your application).

      • Sleepwalker3 says:

        Oops, meant to say Philips might NOT be a good choice for Nylon – I’ve got to start proof reading my posts!

  4. Tom says:

    great idea.

    what is the length of the threaded shaft on the male to female standoffs? Please specify this and if possible offer long ones for acrylic, plywood or thick pcbs.

  5. Rik says:

    Nylon makes this kindof a no buy for me, really don’t like them too be honest and it’s not like metal is that much higher in price.

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