Categories

AirBurr, an autonomous flying robot

Posted on Wednesday, March 6th, 2013 in robotics by DP

od_1542_1_1362511081

Autonomous robot navigates using collisions:

Meet the AirBurr, an autonomous flying robot specifically designed for missions in difficult, confined environments under total darkness. Airburr is inspired b the simple navigation strategy that insects use to follow – It follows a path and if it collides, it has an excellent ability to recover.

Check out the video after the break.

In this video the AirBurr navigates a corridor and a narrow doorway towards a light source using the signals from 4 simple photodiodes. This strategy is particularly adapted to following faint signals in unstructured, cluttered environments, such as gas leaks in collapsed industrial plants. The AirBurr is then programmed to explore a small room using a random direction algorithm similar to the one used by most robotic vacuum cleaners. This exploration strategy is useful in situations where other sensors cannot be used. It is demonstrated through a flight in a completely dark room where vision-based navigation isn’t possible, and can also be used in smoke-filled environments where laser scanners have trouble functioning correctly.

This entry was posted on Wednesday, March 6th, 2013 at 9:00 pm and is filed under robotics. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can skip to the end and leave a response. Pinging is currently not allowed.

One Response to “AirBurr, an autonomous flying robot”

  1. Alan says:

    I would like to see the position / collision data being sent back to a master PC, where a “map” of the area is located.
    Keeping the smarts at the PC should mean the bug is a simplex broadcaster, reducing complexity of data transfer protocol.

Leave a Reply

Notify me of followup comments via e-mail. You can also subscribe without commenting.

Recent Comments

  • J. Peterson: Nice writeup. It looks like some of the formatting for your command examples needs some missing newlines?
  • Geert Jordaens: I'm not sure what kind of licensing I have to add since it is a fairly straight forward implementation of the adaptive Huffman Decoding. For...
  • erich: For anyone interested, I've added some c++ code for adaptive huffman decoding in the git repository.
  • Sjaak: I would add some more protection in the used trigger file (on the serverpilot site) then not using a standard name :) hopefully they use...
  • Pete Castagna: My friend Charlie who worked in synthesizers at a DOD type of place made a modification to this avalanche pulse generator that allowed him to...