WORKSHOP VIDEO #43: How we edit video

in how-to, Videos by Ian | 7 comments

Shooting in the workshop and away is done with JVC Everios in 1080P. They’re nothing more than a lens and CCD, so  OK but the codec is not very good. Recently we’ve been recording the audio with a separate Zoom H1N recoding device, and a cheap Shure lapel mic.

Footage and audio tracks are dumped to a fast solid state hard drive. A descent computing rig saves a ton of time when dealing with multiple tracks of high def video. We label everything and sort it into separate folders. This is the most time consuming part.

Adobe Premier is the least-worst video software we’ve tried. Nothing else in the sub-$500 range compares.

The camera microphone is garbage, so now we record a separate audio track with a Zoom H1N instead. Audio and video are synced during editing. A script like PluralEyes automates the syncing process, but it can be messy. Lately it’s much quicker to do it manually if we scream “SYNC” into both the camera and the external microphone. This creates a clearly distinguishable pattern in both sound files that’s easy to locate and sync up.

B-roll is secondary footage that shows the stuff people talking about in interviews. It also comes in handy for patching over mistakes in the original footage. Most of the footage we shoot is B-roll, little 5 second clips of stuff and things. Most appear on the screen for 1 to 1.75 seconds total. This seems typical for most modern TV shows and travel programs.

Most of the work is cutting and arranging hundreds of clips into a final video.  When the video is done we export to a 1080p widescreen MP4, usually around 60 meg per minute in size. Upload to YouTube takes a few minutes, and then they give us 3 awkward frame freezes to choose as the cover image.

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Comments

  1. JBeale says:

    I used to do event video production full time. I used the full version of Sony Vegas Pro, which is over your cost limit but there are a range of cheaper versions going from “Movie Studio” at $50 to “Vegas Pro Edit” at $500. On the other hand, if you’re OK with what you’ve got, no reason to switch. Props to you for going the extra mile to get good sound, it really makes a difference.

  2. Dusten says:

    This is good stuff, now if you can get Chris Gammell to show how he does pod-casts with Dave. Then my knowledge base will be complete to start my own thing going.

  3. Justin Shumaker says:

    Ian, would you please send me the RealTek Application Note on Transformerless Ethernet, I am unable to find it.

  4. Justin Shumaker says:

    I was looking at your previous post:
    http://dangerousprototypes.com/2010/10/27/no-magnetics-ethernet-coupling-with-capacitors/

    In the picture it says that it is a RealTek Application Note… Was this your post? Thanks for any help you can provide in hunting down this elusive document.

    • Ian says:

      This isn’t really the idea place for this ongoing conversation :\ Yes, it is my post about someone elses project. It is one of 1000s posted nearly 2 years ago so I’m sorry if I don’t remember the details…

      That post links to Florin’s site:
      http://www.youritronics.com/?p=3418

      And then if you search the page for “application note from Realtek” there is a link about 1/3rd of the way down the page. I’ll leave that part to you.

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