NEW PRODUCT: Surface mount protoboard SOIC

in BP v3, Prototypes by Sjaak | 9 comments

Dangerous Protoboard: Bus Pirate v3/SOIC is now available for $10.  This is Sjaak’s special Dangerous Protoboard for working with SOIC chips and SMD parts, it includes a Bus Pirate v3 connector for easy testing.

It has footprints for:

  • 0805 parts (59x)
  • SOIC chips from .150″ to .3″ (max 112 pins)
  • SOT23-3 (16x)
  • 26×10 pin through-hole prototype area
  • Bus Pirate v3 connector and breakout

We do an lot of prototyping and we had the need for a simple SMD prototype board as most of the parts in our partbox are SMD. This PCB allows us quickly to whip up a working prototype using SMD/SMT components, without going through a full development-cycle of creating a nice looking schematic, designing a neat PCB, sending it to the fab house, and waiting for the postman to arrive. This dramatically reduces our development time.

Demo

We used this board for the XMas demonstration we posted last year.

USB VID fundraiser

This board also doubles as a fundraiser for an USB VID for Dangerous Prototypes. We currently use a VID/PID supplied by Microchip for our projects, but that comes with a lot of restrictions which aren’t suitable for open source projects. For example you may not use the VID/PID for more then 10,000 units, which is incompatible with open source licensing.

There are currently no ‘freely’ available numbers tailormade for open source projects. Getting a ‘private’ VID from USB.org is the only real solution, but also a costly one. The cheapest option they offer is a $2,000 onetime fee to get a VID. This one is valid for ever, but $2000 is a lot or money for us… That’s why we started this fundraiser.

Get one

Get your mighty handy SMD protoboard at Seeed for just $10!

What are you going to make with the Dangerous Protoboard? Please drop us a line.


This entry was posted in BP v3, Prototypes and tagged , .

Comments

  1. Metis says:

    Great design, but I miss a TQFP breakout area[1] :-(

    [1]: http://www.nuelectronics.com/estore/images/nustore/TQFP_ADP.jpg

    Anyway I may buy some soon :-)

    • Ian says:

      Coming next week we hope:) with and without full prototyping area

    • Sjaak says:

      We have a long road ahead before it is really perfect :)

      We usually put out a (couple of) testversions, listen to the comments and make a better version. As Ian already told the secret that there will be QFP versions later on :) but ssssssst!

  2. AkosL says:

    regarding the TQFP version: maybe add a (semi thick) copper line around the pins, so one can solder all gnd pins to the copper outline, and add some decoupling caps.

  3. Ronan says:

    I’ve also wondered about getting myself a VID, however I agree that $2000 is too much for a prototyper. Instead, I’ve considered making a “collective VID”, since 0xFFFF PIDs, or 65535 products is probably enough to share among many prototypers. In this case, each PID would be about $0.03 each.

    As such, I inteded to, for example, raise enough contributors with less than $10 each, getting also 256 PIDs each. That would be quite cool, but unfortunately I don’t have enough of a “web presence” to gather that many would-be PID owners.

    It’s a good idea that maybe you could pull off (just a suggestion, and I would surely contribute).

    • Sjaak says:

      I’m not sure about reselling the numbers. There used to be online electronicshops that resell theese numbers, and Wouter van Ooijen (voti.nl) was one of them. He acquired a VID number and sold blocks for little to none profit. The usb.org did ask him to stop this activity. I think he was allowed to resell them (or give them away at cost) since he got an exclusive number.

      link to the obsolete shopitem: http://www.voti.nl/shop/catalog.html?USB-PID-10 Here you can see his reaction on the usb.org action and a faq about the vid/pid numbers

  4. I think noone should allow usb.org to tax the shit out of people. The question is 1) whether they can succeed with their legal actions and 2) what the hell are they doing besides taxing people? What do they provide in return (besides the block which cost them nothing)?

    • Sjaak says:

      The common sense is that (after buying a VID) it is yours, and you can do whatever you want. However large companies or organisations has more funds for lawyers then we do. DangerousPrototypes (and many others) are just a bunch of crazy people that like to do electronics as a hobby and don’t earn lots of money with it. It is just for fun and we don’t like to spend a lot of time in court (prefferable no time!). Yes it is unfair, but this is how it works in real world.

      Besides keeping track of a couple of numbers, they came up with the usb specifications software and hardware. Designing a specification isn’t done easily and take lots of years thinking.

      You are BTW free to use a random number and burn it in your USB hardware and use it. The problem is when you are using the same number as an other device. THis will give lots of driver trouble and confusing of the OS (Don’t have much experience with linux and USB, but it certain applies to Windows). In a lab situation this won’t bother many people, but if you are selling hardware to people (ie endusers) that aren’t as technical as the R&D, it will lead to many many service request, which take up valuable design time. Prolly you get some lawsuits of the real owner that bought the VID (in order to avoid these troubles in the first place). DangerousPrototype hardware is hitting a certain volume that makes it necessary to obtain a VID, in order to avoid lawsuits and angry customers. We would like that there was a special range of numbers specially targetted for hobbyist and small manufactures (like what Wouter van Ooijen did before he got the letter from usb.org).

  5. I’m now not positive where you are getting your information, but good topic. I must spend some time learning more or working out more. Thanks for excellent info I was in search of this information for my mission.

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