Extended temperature Bus Pirate

in Bus Pirate, manufacturing by Ian | 8 comments

The next batch of Bus Pirate v3b is almost ready. It will ship with bootloader v4.4 and firmware v5.3. It will also be the only known batch of Bus Pirates to use an extended temperature range PIC 24FJ64GA002-E/SS. There weren’t any standard industrial temperature range chips available, so Seeed sourced the extended range version.

These “E” PIC chips have a wider operating temperature range and cost a few cents more. The E chips are rated for -40c to 125c, compared to -40c to 85c with standard industrial chips. In practical terms this doesn’t mean anything because another component might not like higher temperatures, and internal oscillator doesn’t allow for overclocking.

In anticipation of ongoing delays, Seeed has backordered industrial range 24FJ64GA002-I/SS PICs too.

Get a Bus Pirate for $30, including worldwide shipping at Seeed Studio. Adafruit also has the Bus Pirate and probe cables in stock and ready to ship.

This entry was posted in Bus Pirate, manufacturing and tagged , , , .

Comments

  1. Adam says:

    Should that be -40oC? :)

  2. octal says:

    Is it really usefull?
    This is and will be a hacker tool to debug communications, not a production tool. I dont see what does industrial grade component bring to BusPirate :(
    If it was for the WebPlatform it would had been welcome, as such tool needs really to work in any kind of environments to permit distant control of processes. For BusPirtat, I dont see the utility.

    Regards
    Ahmed

    • Sjaak says:

      It isn’t, as stated in the post:

      “.. There weren’t any standard industrial temperature range chips available, so Seeed sourced the extended range version. ..”

      They did this only to prevent shortage of buspirates.

  3. octal says:

    sorry I did read it so quickly :(

  4. Drone says:

    I find it amazing that Microchip cannot deliver these processors reliably. Once again we’re hearing about hard to find PIC parts with something like this from Dangerous Prototypes. Is there something wrong with their supply chain in China? Maybe these parts are orphans in their product line? Watching this unfold makes think I should use something other than a PIC if and when I ever do a halfway significant production run of a product (never-mind mass market).

    • tayken says:

      The main reason is that we prototypers or small business owners are far down the food-chain. Microchip and other companies earn most of their profit from big manufacturing companies so they give them the priority. It is not something to do with Microchip, you can probably find small quantities from Farnell or Digi-key but for small time mass production, there might not be enough parts.

      • Ian says:

        Yup, Microchip can manufacture 100K in 6-8weeks, simply amazing, but we want it *now*, and only a few hundred of them. Big companies do much more planning and have a ton invested in stock. We do short runs with parts from distributors with 3-4week lead times. It’s really amazing that we can do it at all.

        I don’t think there is any manufacturer immune to this. There is a widely reported shortage of the ATMEL chips used the the Arduino (see sparkfun’s slugs).

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