IR or RF remote control design

in infrared, Infrared toy by Ian | 2 comments

There’s been talk of adapting the USB Infrared Toy to transmit AM radio frequencies as well as infrared light. Today we noticed a similar project by Peter Jakab.

Peter’s DIY remote control based on PIC can emit IR or RF, depending on the output device. With an IR LED and it outputs normal remote control pulse-trains. Substitute an oscillator for the IR LED and it transmits¬† radio frequencies.

The RF option is about the simplest type of transmitter possible. The oscillator output connects to an antenna. The microcontoller switches the oscillator on and off to encode data.

Via Hacked Gadgets, a long-time friend of Dangerous Prototypes. Alan Parekh and Ian were writers for DIY Life years ago.

This entry was posted in infrared, Infrared toy and tagged , , .

Comments

  1. TEN says:

    After quite a few people shared their suggestions at http://dangerousprototypes.com/2010/01/29/prototype-usb-infrared-remote-control-receivertransmitter/#comments I have elaborated somewhat on adding RF (less complex actually than IR) as well as the use the UART could be put to (with a VFD) at http://dangerousprototypes.com/forum/index.php?topic=431.0 – only very little extra hardware (optional MAX232, and header to connect other transceivers to previously unused pins) and code should be needed to multiply the potential of the USB Toy.

  2. TEN says:

    After quite a few people shared their suggestions at http://dangerousprototypes.com/2010/01/29/prototype-usb-infrared-remote-control-receivertransmitter/#comments I have elaborated somewhat on adding RF (less complex actually than IR) as well as the use the UART could be put to (with a VFD) at http://dangerousprototypes.com/forum/index.php?topic=431.0 – only very little extra hardware (optional MAX232, and header to connect other transceivers to previously unused pins) and code should be needed to multiply the potential of the USB Toy.

    Unlike Peter Jakab’s project, this would not be about building one’s own custom RF remote control (nor about hacking the keypads of specific ones), but sampling and replaying all of those which come with the myriad of household electronics for RF just like LIRC has already done for years with IR.

    A few “power users” might end up with an array of transceivers (cheap as they are) for different frequencies and/or modulations, but typically one or two will do (such as 433 MHz AM in Europe) as even the most diverse devices and vendors may still use very similar radio modules with the difference just being in the protocols (that can be recorded and played back over the same hardware, at low data rates very much like those found in IR remote controls).

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