App note: USB DFU protocol used in the STM32 bootloader

in app notes by DP | 0 comments

application

An app note from ST, USB DFU protocol used  in the STM32 bootloader (PDF!):

This application note describes the USB DFU protocol used in STM32 microcontroller bootloader. It details each supported command. For more information about the USB hardware resources and requirements for your device bootloader, please refer to the “STM32 system memory boot mode” application note (AN2606)

Install a pressurized water system on your car bumper

in how-to by DP | 0 comments

jeep-water1

Want to add this on your car? Check out Eddie Zarick‘s video on how to install a pressurized water system on your car bumper:

A step by step guide to me cutting up my 15′ Wrangler and installing some running water from my stock rear bumper using a 12v RV pump. Check it out!

Via Make.

Check out the video after the break. Continue reading →

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Free PCB coupon via Facebook to 2 random commenters

in Free PCBs by DP | 1 comment

BP

Every Friday we give away some extra PCBs via Facebook. This post was announced on Facebook, and on Monday we’ll send coupon codes to two random commenters. The coupon code usually go to Facebook ‘Other’ Messages Folder . More PCBs via Twitter on Tuesday and the blog every Sunday. Don’t forget there’s free PCBs three times every week:

Continue reading →

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How to create a signed Windows 8 driver for USB Ir Toy

in USB IR Toy by DP | 0 comments

capture

 

HakanL writes:

As part of a home automation project I’ve been testing different infrared receivers/transmitters. One inexpensive USB-based transceiver is the USB Infrared Toy (v2)
This uses the Microchip PIC 18F2550 microcontroller which acts as a virtual USB serial port. The problem is that the included driver isn’t signed so it can’t be used in Windows 8.x. Various people have suggested to disable signature checking in Windows, but that’s both risky and complicated. I wanted to go the proper route instead, which is to sign the driver with a certificate. A real certificate is about $180/year (code signing certificate) and I didn’t wan to pay that, so the alternative is to use a self-created certificate and ask Windows to trust that (which is a normal Windows process, doesn’t require a diagnostic boot, etc). I wanted to document the steps so it can be reproduced as well for other drivers.

Details at Hakan’s coding and stuff site.

An NFC implant to open doors and unlocking PCs

in MSP430 by DP | 0 comments

nfc_implant

Fred over at the 430h forum shared another project using his NFC implant and an MSP4305529 to unlock his PC:

I recent completed the prototype of my LoginNFC project. It’s a combination of MSP430 acting as a USB keyboard (and CDC serial for configuration) and a TRF7970A NFC reader. The prototype was done with a F5529 LaunchPad and TRF7970A Booster – along with a ferrite antenna to improve the read range.
It’s working well and I did a small write-up here

Via 43oh forum.

Project info at Fred’s project page.

Check out the video after the break.

Continue reading →

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WIFI Mains Power Dimmer / Switch with CBDBv2

in DirtyPCBs.com, wireless by DP | 1 comment

1MPDMv2FINISHEDTOP1

 MAINS Power Dimmer / Switch Module project by Tracker J:

Now it’s about time to talk also about what many of you has asked for: DIMMING!
It’s a total different story, little bit complicated but, as you will see, not so hard to understand.

General considerations:
There are several types of dimmers generally available. These are used for resistive, and inductive loads, such as incandescent,cold cathode and low voltage (inductive) lamp sources. Note that not all electronic transformers used for low voltage lamps are suitable for dimming by Triac or Thyristors dimmers. In case of Thyristors you need 2 of them as Thyristor is a Unidirectional device and because AC power flows in both directions!

Project info at ESP8266 projects.

Check out the video after the break.

Continue reading →

NExuS project

in Arduino by DP | 0 comments

IMG_20150708_204853

Adam over at Maniacal Labs has written up documentation on his NExuS weekend project:

My main desires for this build was that the NES look completely stock and unchanged from the front and that original, unmodified, NES gamepads worked via the original gamepad ports. Fortunately, this turned out not to be too bad. First, I needed all the extra parts that would allow me to break out power, network, and video for the Nexus player, and to hook up some extra peripherals. Some I already had lying around, some I had to order but for all parts, these are the exact items:

  • microUSB to microUSB Extension Cable
  • IEC320 C7 Socket
  •  Ethernet Coupler
  • 8″ HDMI Extension
  • Right Angle microUSB Cable
  • microUSB Ethernet Adapter and USB Hub

Also needed were:

  • NES Gamepad Hookup PCB (more on this below)
  • M4-0.7 screws (10-16mm length)
  • Printed brackets (more on this below)
  • 16 AWG Wire
  • Female 2-prong socket end
  • Hot Glue
  • Quick Set Epoxy
  • Low Grit Sandpaper

Project details at Maniacal Labs project page.

2.2 or 2.4 or 2.8 inch SPI TFT LCD ILI9341 to Arduino Uno

in Arduino, Interface by DP | 0 comments

Arduino+to+2.8+LCD+schematic.bmp

Bob Davis  has written an article on interfacing a 2.8 inch SPI TFT LCD ILI9341 with the Arduino Uno:

Over the weekend I figured out how to interface a 2.8 inch SPI TFT that has a ILI9341 chip to an Arduino Uno.  All it takes is eight 1K resistors.  Most people use a 4050 IC.  Here is the schematic
I am using the Adafruit ILI9341 driver found at github
Note that the Adafruit LCD has level shifters for 5 volts built into it.

More details at Bob Davis’ blog.

Check out the video after the break.

Continue reading →

#FreePCB via Twitter to 2 random RTs

in Free PCBs by DP | 0 comments

buspiratev383

Every Tuesday we give away two coupons for the free PCB drawer via Twitter. This post was announced on Twitter, and in 24 hours we’ll send coupon codes to two random retweeters. Don’t forget there’s free PCBs three times a every week:

  • Hate Twitter and Facebook? Free PCB Sunday is the classic PCB giveaway. Catch it every Sunday, right here on the blog
  • Tweet-a-PCB Tuesday. Follow us and get boards in 144 characters or less
  • Facebook PCB Friday. Free PCBs will be your friend for the weekend

Some stuff:

  • Yes, we’ll mail it anywhere in the world!
  • Check out how we mail PCBs worldwide video.
  • We’ll contact you via Twitter with a coupon code for the PCB drawer.
  • Limit one PCB per address per month please.
  • Like everything else on this site, PCBs are offered without warranty.

We try to stagger free PCB posts so every time zone has a chance to participate, but the best way to see it first is to subscribe to the RSS feed, follow us on Twitter, or like us on Facebook.

The factory of the world – Hackaday documentary on the Shenzhen Ecosystem

in documentation, interviews by DP | 0 comments

The factory of the world – Hackaday documentary on the Shenzhen Ecosystem

When it comes to manufacturing, no place in the world has the same kind of allure as the Pearl River Delta region of China. Within just an hour-long train ride, two vastly different cultures co-exist, each with its unique appeal that keeps attracting engineers, entrepreneurs, and hustlers alike. On the mainland side, cities like Shenzhen and Guangzhou bring the promise of cheap components, low-cost contract work, and the street cred of “having done the Shenzhen thing.” And on the island, the capitalist utopia called Hong Kong glows with all of its high finance and stories of lavish expat lifestyles.
As the “new” China evolves, it seems like it’s exactly the convergence of these two cultures that will bring the biggest change—and not just to the area but to the whole world. Still, understanding what exactly is going on and what the place is really all about remains a mystery to many. So, this June, we jumped on the bandwagon and headed east, trying to get our own feel for the whole thing.

Via Hackaday.

LM2596 DC-DC converter module testing

in testing by DP | 1 comment

LM2596Module

Kerry D. Wong writes:

In the video below, I tested this DC-DC converter board under various operating conditions and measured its efficiencies. To conclude, these switching regulator boards are well suited for low to medium current draw digital circuitry but for higher current applications a heat sink is needed and even so I would not recommend running it at the maximum 3A load especially if the input voltage is high.

Check out the video after the break.

Continue reading →

DIY csCNC – 2 (Linistepper driver and testing with Bus Pirate)

in Bus Pirate, DIY, tools by DP | 0 comments

diy-linistepper-4

Oakkar7 has a nice build log on his DIY csCNC, he writes:

Since I started building DIY CNC, I checked the free, opensource motor controller. There are several alternatives. I chose linisteppr controller.
– Simple and cheap (my first priority :) ) and I can source required parts locally
–  microstepping, open design (Especially, it’s PIC16F628A based. I’m PIC guy and a lot 16F628A in my stock)
Build log is fast, simple and straight. I used a simple perfboard for faster development.

After building the driver, I tested it with my buspirate using PWM function for generating stepping pulse. I started with 1kHz and increased to 4 kHz.

Project details at Oakkar7 blog.

App note: Designer’s guide for the Si114x

in app notes by DP | 0 comments

an_siliconlabs_an498

Si114x proximity sensors from Silicon Labs design guide. Link here

This application note provides an outline for using the Si114x proximity detector and ambient-light sensor. General considerations of electrical and optical component selection, programming, and power consumption are explained so as to cover the majority of situations.

Free PCB Sunday: Pick your PCB

in Free PCBs by DP | 44 comments

IRToy

We go through a lot of prototype PCBs, and end up with lots of extras that we’ll never use. Every Sunday we give away a few PCBs from one of our past or future projects, or a related prototype. Our PCBs are made through Seeed Studio’s Fusion board service. This week two random commenters will get a coupon code for the free PCB drawer tomorrow morning. Pick your own PCB. You get unlimited free PCBs now – finish one and we’ll send you another! Don’t forget there’s free PCBs three times every week:

Continue reading →

Posted in Free PCBs | Tagged | 44 Comments

App note: Touchless lavatory appliance design

in app notes by DP | 0 comments

an_siliconlabs_an522

Using the Silicon Labs’s Si1141 sensor and C8051F9xx series microcontroller for touchless lavatory. Link here

The Si1141 is a single-channel, reflectance-based proximity detector with an integrated ambient light sensor and can be used as a touchless sensor IC in lavatory appliances. As a proximity detector, the Si1141 has two infrared photodiodes, flexible ADC integration time, and multiple signal ranges. In addition to the configurable ADC sensitivity configuration settings, the Si1141 can dynamically drive an irLED with anywhere from 6 to 400 mA. This high level of flexibility in the ADC, photodiode choice, and irLED drive strength all contribute to allow the end product to operate under various ambient light conditions.

Building a CC2500 to BLE adaptor

in PCBs, project logs by DP | 0 comments

pcb

Don has been working on a CC2500 to BLE adaptor project, that is available on Github:

Posting some details in response to questions about the current module.  Everything for the CC2500 is on Github.  Fish around here and you’ll also find some iOS and Pebble code.  Sorry, nothing Android based.
The RFDuino is programmed like any other Arduino, it’s worthwhile to use their usb shield.  The CC2500 is controlled via SPI(from the RFDuino), there’s nothing to program.

Project info at Don’s blog.

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Free PCB coupon via Facebook to 2 random commenters

in Free PCBs by DP | 0 comments

KHOS-2-3-4-5-6P

Every Friday we give away some extra PCBs via Facebook. This post was announced on Facebook, and on Monday we’ll send coupon codes to two random commenters. The coupon code usually go to Facebook ‘Other’ Messages Folder . More PCBs via Twitter on Tuesday and the blog every Sunday. Don’t forget there’s free PCBs three times every week:

Continue reading →

More awesome DoorBell control

in DIY by DP | 0 comments

19756763728_783d52da30_o

Felix of LowPowerLab posted an update on his DoorBell Mote project  we covered previously:

My first DoorBell Mote prototype was working nicely and it allowed monitoring the door bell (while also triggering it remotely – toddlers love it). But I wanted more. On weekends the family likes to get a well deserved nap during the day and often those pesky solicitors ring the bell and wake everyone up. So naturally the doorbell has to be disabled also, without major effort or any disconnected wires. Sounds like the perfect addition to the Door Bell Mote. So I made a new revision and a proper PCB for this, below is the schematic with the changes and the proto PCB from OSHPark. Actually I made more changes to the schematic after putting together the PCB, so there are some differences. I’ve tried a LTV814H optocoupler for AC detection instead of the more expensive H11AA11, it works just as well, but both can be used on this PCB

Details at LowPowerLab site.

Interfacing a chord keypad to Papilio Duo FPGA board

in DIY by DP | 0 comments

chord_pad

Ken writes:

This is a simple chord style keypad that I made up a few years ago.  It is loosely based on the Microwriter – an early UK designed portable keypad / notewriter.
The five main keys are located under the fingertips and thumb of the right hand, plus an additional shift key that can be held down with the thumb.  This combination allows up to 64 key combinations  – which is enough for simple ascii, alphas and numerals.
However, this time the application is not for text entry, but to allow very rapid access to menu items, tools and colour options for a CAD program – without having to break concentration and use the keyboard.

Project info at Ken’s SustainableSuburbia blog.

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